Understanding BBBEE Skills Development

 

Did you know that Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) has the potential to address inequality, create a better life, and boost economic growth and development through skills development?

This article provides an in-depth understanding of what BBBEE is, including the BBBEE Act, BBBEE skills development, BBBEE skills development training, and BBBEE skills development strategy. Read on.

What is BBBEE?

BBBEE is an acronym for Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment. It’s a form of economic empowerment introduced by the South African government to eliminate inequality and distribute wealth equally to all South Africans who were previously disadvantaged.

BBBEE is a program borne out of the effort of the South African Government to educate, train, and give a better life to a larger percentage of South Africa’s population that was previously disadvantaged under the apartheid rule.

In a nutshell, BBBEE can be defined as a South African government authorized tool for unlocking funds for empowering broad-based community “upliftment.*”

*Upliftment, mostly used in South Africa, is the process of raising the education level and economic status of disadvantaged groups.

BBBEE is implemented to help many black people who have been disadvantaged by the legacy of the apartheid systems and inequitable educational practices. The program aims at accelerating the participation of black people in the economy by encouraging positive changes.

When properly executed, BBBEE is capable of supporting job creation and global competitiveness, and boosting economic growth through skills development.  BBBEE creates a more skilled workforce by reducing the burden on entrepreneurs.

BBBEE Act

The BBBEE Act is the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act 53 of 2003. It provides the legislative framework for the BBBEE program in South Africa.

The main purpose of the BBBEE Act is to address the legacy of apartheid in South Africa and promote the economic participation of Black People in the South African economy.

The BBBEE Act is a powerful expression of the policy enacted by the South African government to actively promote and implement BBBEE.

In terms of the BBBEE Act, it’s a criminal offence for a person to intentionally:

  • Misrepresent or attempt to misrepresent a firm’s BBBEE status,
  • Provide false information or misrepresent information to a BBBEE verification professional to secure a certain BBBEE status or benefit,
  • Provide false information or misrepresent information relevant to assessing BBBEE status to an organ of state or public entity,
  • Engage in a “fronting practice*.”

*Fronting practice is a transaction, arrangement, or other act/conduct that directly or indirectly frustrates or undermines the achievement of the objectives of the BBBEE Act or the implementation of any of the provisions of the BBBEE Act.

An individual who is found guilty will pay a fine and/or be subjected to up to 10 years’ imprisonment. A firm that is found guilty may be fined up to 10 percent of its annual turnover.

A convicted individual, as well as his/her directors and shareholders (in certain situations), is banned from transacting with the Government and public entities for 10 years from the date of conviction.

A BBBEE verification officer, a procurement officer of a governmental body, or a procurement officer of a public entity who becomes aware of such a criminal offence but fails to report it is considered guilty of a criminal offence and is liable to pay a fine and/or be subjected to up to 12 months’ imprisonment.

The BBBEE Act also:

  • Introduces a statutory right for the Government and public entities to cancel any contract or “authorization” awarded due to “knowingly” furnished false information on a firm’s BBBEE status;
  • Imposes an absolute obligation on Government and public entities to apply the BBBEE Codes in their procurement policies and qualification criteria for licenses and authorizations, and for entering public-private partnerships;
  • Imposes an obligation on entities listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange to report to the Commission on their compliance with BBBEE.

BBBEE Scorecard

The BBBEE program is measured through the BBBEE Scorecard. The BBBEE Scorecard system is made up of seven elements namely:

  • Ownership,
  • Management and control,
  • Employment equity,
  • Skills development,
  • Preferential procurement,
  • Enterprise development, and
  • Socio-economic development.

Each element has certain weighing points assigned to it. For instance

BBBEE Element Maximum Number of Weighting Points Available
Ownership 25
Management Control 15 plus 4 bonus points
Skills Development 20 plus 5 bonus points
New Enterprise and Supplier Development 40 plus 4 bonus points
Socio-Economic Development 5
TOTAL 118

 

Just as its name depicts, the purpose of the BBBEE scorecard is to determine your BBBEE preferential procurement level and to give you a guideline on how you can improve upon your current level.

What Are The Benefits Of Utilizing The BBBEE Scorecard?

Having favorable scores on the BBBEE scorecard gives many opportunities, which include the following:

  • Ability to interact with the government on tender procedures;
  • Ability to converse with like-minded companies who are in line with requirements needed for rating the scorecard;
  • Ability to make a difference in the sustainable economic landscape in South Africa.

The BBBEE scorecard measures three main components of BBBEE and some scenarios need to be considered in all three:

  • Direct empowerment through ownership and management control,
  • Individual empowerment through employment equity and skills development,
  • Indirect empowerment through preferential procurement, enterprise development, and socio-economic development.

BBBEE scorecard

BBBEE Absorption Points

The BBBEE absorption points help us to understand and use the BBBEE scorecard. Here are the absorption points for each element on the BBBEE scorecard:

  • Ownership

This has to do with the level of black ownership of a firm or company and always has 20 main points plus 3 bonus points. When determining the level of black ownership of a company, the company or firms earns points for the following:

Description Weighting Target Your score
Exercisable voting rights in the hands of black people 3 25%+1 vote
Exercisable voting rights in the hands of black women 2 10%
Economic interest (% ownership) of black people 4 25%
Economic interest (% ownership) of black women 2 2.5%
Economic interest of black new entrants or black participants of broad-based ownership schemes or co-operatives 1 2.5%
Ownership fulfilment (all shares fully paid) 1 Yes
Net value of shares (as % of total net value) 7 5%
Bonus points
% of total shareholding by black new entrants 2 10%
% of total shareholding by black participants of broad-based ownership schemes or co-operatives 1 10%
Total Points 23

 

Calculating ownership points:

For instance, the target for black ownership (economic interest) is 25% with 4 achievable points. If a firm has only one black shareholder who owns 5% of the firm, then the firm has achieved 20% of the target and will, therefore, score 20% of the achievable 4 points i.e. 5% (actual) ÷ 25% (target) x 4 (achievable points) = 0.8 points scored.

  • Management and Control

This has to do with the percentage of black people in control of the direction of a firm’s business operation as well as those in top management who control the daily operations. It has 10 points plus 1 bonus point.

Description Weighting Target Your score
Board Participation
% of voting rights held by black board members (using ARG adjustment) 3 50%
% of executive directors (using ARG adjustment) 2 50%
Top Management Participation
% of black senior top management (using ARG adjustment) 3 40%
% of black other top management (using ARG adjustment) 3 40%
Bonus Points
% of black people who are independent non-executives 1 40%
Total Points 11

 

  • Employment Equity

This measures the representation of black people at each management level in business and counts 15 points plus 3 bonus points.

Description Weighting Target (2017) Your score
Black disabled people as a % of all full-time employees 2 3%
Black senior management (using ARG adjustment) 5 60%
Black middle management (using ARG adjustment) 4 75%
Black junior management (using ARG adjustment) 4 80%
Bonus Points
Meeting or exceeding EAP* levels on the above items (one point per item, excluding black disabled people). Bonus points are subject to achieving at least 40% of all the above four targets 3 40%
Total Points 18

* EAP (Economically Active Population) refers to the percentage of the total labor force that is made up of black people, as determined by Statistics SA. It’s presently about 87%.

  • Skills Development

Skills development measures a firm’s investment in the training and development of its black employees. It is an excellent way for any firm to align its business growth and BBBEE strategy, regardless of the size of the firm, because it directly benefits the skills base of the firm’s workforce.

Scroll down for more discussion about BBBEE skills development.

  • Preferential Procurement

This element allows businesses to gain significant points on procurement or spend as long as the procurement is made from suppliers that already have high BBBEE score ratings.

The immediate suppliers’ BBBEE score ratings, in turn, depend on their suppliers’ score ratings, and so the pressure to become BBBEE compliant spreads down the value chain – from the producer to the final consumer. This element has 20 points.

Level of Suppliers

Level of Supplier % claimable Amount spent Amount claimable
Level 1 (100pts +) 135% R10,000 R13,500
Level 2 (85 – 99) 125% R10,000 R12,500
Level 3 (75 – 84) 110% R10,000 R11,000
Level 4 (65 – 74) 100% R10,000 R10,000
Level 5 (55 – 64) 80% R10,000 R8,000
Level 6 (45 – 54) 60% R10,000 R6,000
Level 7 (40 – 44) 50% R10,000 R5,000
Level 8 (30 – 39) 10% R10,000 R1,000
Non-compliant (less than 30) 0% R10,000 R0

 

Description Weighting Target (2017) Your score
Claimable BBBEE procurement spent as a % of total procurement spend 12 70%
Claimable BBBEE procurement spent from Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs) and Exempted Micro Enterprises (EMEs) as a % of total spending. 3 15%
Procurement from suppliers that are majority black-owned (max 3pts), or 30% or more black women-owned (max 2pts) 5 20%
Total Points 20

 

  • Enterprise Development

This element accounts for what a business does to support the creation or growth of another BBBEE business, which also involves the contribution to the enterprise development funds. This element has 15 points and is divided into two categories namely:

Category A: contributions made to Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs) or Exempted Micro Enterprises (EMEs) that are mainly black-owned or owned by black women.

Category B: contributions made to any other business that is mainly black-owned or owned by black women. The business must have over 25% but less than 50% black.

Description Weighting Target Your score
Average annual value of contributions made in the past five years, as a % of average annual net profit after tax for the same five years 15 3%

 

  • Socio-economic Development

This element accounts for corporate social investment and has 5 points. Generally, this element includes a company’s donations to charity or involvement in industry-specific charity-based initiatives.

Description Weighting Target Your score
Average annual value of all qualifying contributions as a % of average annual net profit after tax 5 1%

 

Priority Elements of the BBBEE Scorecard

The amended BBBEE Codes of Good Practice, popularly referred to as the “new Codes,” came into effect on 1 May 2015. The new code introduced the concept of priority elements.

There are three priority elements on the BBBEE scorecard which firms must comply with for verification. These priority elements are Ownership, Skills Development, and Enterprise and Supplier Development.

A Qualifying Small Enterprise (QSE) must comply with at least two of the three priority elements, of which Ownership is compulsory while a generic entity must comply with all three of these priority elements.

BBBEE Skills Development Training

Understanding skills development is a necessity for all business owners. Although skills development training is always considered as an important pillar for economic growth, stability, and success, there are some practical issues, such as lack of funds, which can impede skills development.

This is why BBBEE Skills Development Training is very important. It creates avenues for upskilling and bridges the gap between experience and certification.

Of all the three BBBEE priority elements, skills development is one of the easiest to comply with. It measures the extent to which firms execute initiatives designed to develop or upgrade the competencies of black people internally and externally.

Skills development carries lots of weight when it comes to BBBEE compliance and there are several benefits businesses stand to enjoy by complying. For instance, the South African Revenue Service (SARS) offers a tax break of R60,000 for each participant on a learnership program.

Skills Development Scorecard

The Skills Development Scorecard measures monetary spending on black candidates. It also measures the number of black people who are enrolled in Learnership programs. That is, the Skills Development Scorecard applies to hit targets on:

  • Total spending on training compared to total payroll,
  • Headcount of black people who receive training compared to total headcount. Note that points can also be earned by training unemployed black candidates.

Total spending on training compared to total payroll

Large businesses must spend about 6% of their total payroll on BBBEE skills development training while QSEs must spend about 3% of their total payroll. When they do this, they will earn 8 points on the BBBEE scorecard. They can further earn 4 points by training Black disabled employees.

Headcount requirement of black people

Businesses must train about 2.5% of their total payroll. This equals 1 person in every 40 staff and 10 persons in 400 staff, and so on. A business would earn 8 points by complying with this rule.

Bonus Points for Employment

A business can earn a maximum of 5 bonus points by employing learners at the end of their Learnership program or if the learner is employed by another business.

Therefore, a firm must endeavor to employ unemployed black learners at the end of the program. The bonus points are allocated according to the percentage of unemployed black people on the learnerships absorbed at the end of the Learnership.

For instance, if five unemployed black learners were sponsored to complete the Learnership and just one gets employed after completing the program. The company that handled the learnership program will earn one bonus point out of the maximum 5 bonus points available. However, this can only be effective if such a learner is employed permanently or on a fixed-term contract.

Description Weighting Target Your score
Skills Development Spending
Skills Development expenditure on learning programs for black people as a percentage of payroll 8 6%
Skills Development expenditure on learning programs for black employees with disabilities as a percentage of payroll 4 0.3%
Learnership, Apprenticeships, and Internships
Number of black people participating in learnerships, apprenticeships and internships as a percentage of the total number of employees 4 2.5%
Number of black unemployed people participating in training as a percentage of the total number of employees 4 2.5%
Bonus Points
Bonus points for the number of black people absorbed by the measured company or the industry at the end of the learnership, apprenticeship and internship programs 5 100%
Total 25

 

The sub-minimum requirement is 40% of the total weighting points for skills development training, which on the BBBEE scorecard is 20 points. Also, black women should form about 40% to 50% of the beneficiaries of the relevant elements of the BBBEE scorecard. More so, black youths, black people with disabilities, black unemployed people, and black people living in rural areas form part of the beneficiaries.

Note: Skills development training also includes on-the-job training (learnership) or core skills training, as long as the participant can quantify the cost involved in the training using a reasonable methodology.

The skills development initiatives are divided into seven categories – A through G. Initiatives in category B, C, and D training will help businesses to achieve the maximum weighting under the skills development element. This will help there business’ overall rating.

ABET, or Adult Education and Training (AET), is classified as Category A and B training on the learning program matrix. Learnerships are classified under category C and D training,

At BOTi, we offer several ABET learning areas of which numeracy and literacy (communication in English) are the two most popular. We also offer NQF 1 to NQF 4 learnership programs in business practice, ICT, and manufacturing and engineering-related activities.

Important Note:

  1. There are different BBBEE scorecards, which include the following:
  • Generic,
  • QSE,
  • ICTI Generic,
  • ICTI QSE,
  • Transport Generic,
  • Transport QSE,
  • Marketing, Advertising, and Communications Generic,
  • Marketing, Advertising, and Communications QSE,
  • Financial Generic,
  • Financial QSE,
  • Mining Generic,
  • Mining QSE,

But for this writing, the generic BBBEE scorecard is used.

  1. In terms of skills requirements, a business cannot claim any score points for BBBEE skills development training if the following are not in place:
  • Preparation and proof of submission of the workplace skills plan (WSP)
  • Preparation and proof of submission of the annual training plan (ATR)
  • No mandatory training can be calculated for skills points
  1. Black people are categorized into the following groups:
  • African
  • Indian
  • Colored
  1. Disabled people include those who:
  • Have a mental or physical impairment
  • This impairment should be recurring or long-term.
  • This impairment should have limited the individuals of their prospects of entry or advancements in employment.
  1. Skills Expenditure

As stated above, a business must spend at least 6% of its payroll on skill development training. This spending on skills development training includes the following:

  • Spending on black people.
  • 85% of the spending must be on accredited courses i.e. courses in category B, C, D, or E.
  • 15% of the spending can be on non-accredited courses i.e. courses in other categories.
  • This 6% skills expenditure must also be split according to the economically active population (EAP) published by STATS SA.

For more information on our BBBEE skills development programs, kindly contact us or send us an email on info@boti.co.za. Our professional team has over 15 years of experience in skills development training and can help your business reach its BBBEE scorecard goals.

 

14 Tips to help you set up a Learning Management System (LMS) in South Africa

In South Africa a Learning Management System (LMS) is “a software application for the administration, documentation, tracking, reporting, automation and delivery of educational courses, training programs or learning and development programs.  The Learning Management System concept emerged directly from e-learning.”

Here are our top 14 tips to help you set up a Learning Management System (LMS) in South Africa

 

Tip 1:  The LMS System Needs to Cater to South African Legislation

In South Africa, the LMS System should cater to South African legislation in the following manner:

  • Skills Development Legislation and the SETA environment (e.g. the Skills Development Act 97 of 1998
  • The Employment Equity Act
  • The Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment Act 53 of 2003 (BBBEE Act)

Tip 2:  The LMS System needs to integrate with the SETA Work Skills Plan (WSP) and Annual Training Plan

  • Generate Work Skills Plan (WSP) and Annual Training Plan
  • Reports to the relevant SETAs

 

Tip 3: The Learner Management System (LMS) needs to be developed in the context of BBBEE

The Learner Management System (LMS) captures the following  for each  Learner and this information has an impact on the BBEEE Act.

  • Title
  • First name(s), Surname
  • Persal Number
  • Date of Appointment
  • Race
  • ID Number
  • Contact Details (address, email and phone numbers)
  • Gender
  • Salary level
  • Rank, Job title
  • Province, Organisation, Branch, Directorate
  • Disability or Special needs
  • Educational Background
  • Manager’s Details

 

Tip 4:  South Africa – Assessment and Moderation Administration

The SETAs and other accredited bodies in South Africa have various requirements for the creation of Portfolio of Evidence: The system must:

  • Be able to capture Portfolios of Evidence received and link them to the allocated assessor
  • Have the capability to update assessed learners
  • Generate the assessment report
  • automatically upload assessment progress and outcome for courses attended online
  • Have the ability to flag outstanding assessments not captured on time and produce exception reports
  • Be able to select assessed learners for a defined percentage for moderation
  • Schedule moderation after assessment and link to moderators
  • Have ability to flag outstanding moderation not captured on time and produce exception reports
  • send an email to notify the assessors of the outcome of moderation
  • Be able to produce a moderation report
  • Administer learner assessment appeals and have the capacity to issue certificates and statement of results (where applicable).
  • Assessment/Question Types
    • Assessing learning is a crucial part of the learning and training process. Different types of questions will be accommodated, for example:
    • Formative Assessments e.g. Quizzes which include:
    • Choice questions
    • Scaled questions
    • Open-ended questions
    • Summative Assessments e.g. Written Assignments/ Portfolios of Evidence

The system should have the capability of allowing uploading of different types/formats of documents e.g. pdf, docx, xlsx, ppt.

 

Tip 5:  Ensure the system has good Reporting and Monitoring Systems / Data Analysis Systems

The following highlights the functionality/modules of the desired solution for a learner and Learning Reporting is required in terms of:

  • Data Input and Import: up-to-date and accurate learner profile, inter-operable to the HR system, and Services SETA system, existing authoring tool and other relevant systems so that any changes to employees’ information are automatically updated
  • Learner profiles
  • Tracking and Reporting
  • The system must be able to generate
    • Data Analytics: learner trends, patterns and completion rate, and visualisation of data
    • Enrolment and Course Completion report
    • Individual learner transcripts
    • Compliance and non-compliance report for mandatory/compulsory training
    • The system must be able to track post-training activity e.g. Coaching and Mentoring (administration of the workplace post-training activity logbook)

Tip 6:  Efficient Enrolment of Students – Capabilities Tracking and Monitoring of:

  • Admission to a learning programme
  • Enable the capturing of learner application for admission/enrolment to a
  • learning programme
  • Be able to link to the payment system of the Department
  • Send a notification for learners to complete and submit pre-training forms
  • Send a notification to managers for approval of learners
  • Register/re-register/de-register learners (and intergrate with SETA Systems)
  • Be able to detect enrolment withdrawals;
  • be able to detect enrolment duplications i.e. if the learner previously enrolled for the same course
  • Scheduling of trainers and assigning of training rooms; and
  • Generating an automatic application/enrolment outcome

 

Tip 7:  The system must allow for the Creation of High Quality Training Courses

  • Uploading of Training Courses
    • The system must allow administrators to upload courses in the following categories:
      • Internal (In-house course)
      • External (Outsourced)
  • Course Creation (Creating Courses/e-Learning Delivery modes)
    • The e-Learning course should have some, if not all of the following multimedia modalities.
  • Combination of text, pictures, video and sound:
    • Text Advantages are relatively permanent and ability to process it at the reader’s preferred rate
    • Still Pictorial Images: Relatively permanent like text, attract attention and combine well with text
    • Motion Images: Such as video and animation, attract attention and improve attitudes and motivation
    • Aural Information: Such as voice, music and sound effects attract attention well, even when the user is not looking at the screen
    • Combine well with pictorial and motion images
  • Coaching and Cuing: Coaching is used in many forms of multimedia, it appears when the learner either asks for help or the program detects events signifying the learner is having difficulty
  • Collaboration and team learning: provide platforms where learners work together like chat forums, blogs, community of practice etc.
  • Self-Tests: A self-test allows learners to assess whether they are making progress
  • The system should allow for gamification
    • Games have a number of advantages for learning environments. Primarily they can effectively motivate learners and contribute to knowledge and skills
    • Logic games
    • Puzzles
    • Word Games etc.

 

Tip 8:  Quality Management System in line with various Regulatory Requirements

The following functionalities must be available:

  • Capturing and analysis of course evaluation forms
  • Document sharing, tracking and approval such as:
  • Policies
  • Training materials
  • Documents amendments and alterations
  • Training Reports
  • Evaluation (Reaction, Learning, Behaviour and Results)
  • Training Records Administration. Ensure that the Learner Management System has the capability to allow capturing of:
    • Attendance records
    • Assessment Submission
    • Learner Achievements; and
    • Notifications:
      • The system must be capable of generating the following notifications:
      • Mandatory training not attended
      • Reminder to learners scheduled for a class
      • To trainers; learners, supervisors and administrators when a learner does not show up for a class
      • Admission and training schedule to learners, supervisors, as well as trainers assigned to the programme
      • To assessors and moderators, for outstanding work
      • To learners for re-assessment; and
      • For the assessment outcome

 

Tip 9:  The System needs to meet various Financial  Reporting requirements

The system must be able to:

  • Allow for payment of courses
  • Generate expenditure report; and
  • Produce the overall training budget

 

Tip 10: The System must allow for User Access: Learning Management System Functionality

The following highlights the basic functionality of the desired e-Learning system:

  • User profiles and rights -The following profiles must be created:
    • E-Learning course creators: To design and develop e-courses
    • Editing Trainers: Can do anything within a course, including changing the activities but limited to changing the design and layout of the e-course
    • Non-editing Trainers: Can teach in courses and assess learners, but may not make changes to the course
    • Learners: Participate on the activities on the e-course
    • Training coordinator: Enrol learners to a course and provide learner support
    • Programme Manager: schedule courses and assign trainers to courses
    • Training Manager: monitor overall progress of learning activities
    • Security:
      • Internal users may be authenticated against Active Directory
      • External users may be registered as LMS defined users and authenticated against platforms such as LinkedIn, Google, Yahoo, etc.

 

Tip 11:  Allow for virtual training rooms:

  • Live video streaming of training sessions from Head Office (GP) to other hubs (provinces and missions abroad)
  • Schedule a session and send a notification to the participants
  • Streaming must be compatible on both personal computers and smart phones
  • Generate attendance registers for streaming sessions
  • Virtual Breakaway room
  • Questions and Answers capability
  • Recording of training sessions
  • Document sharing.

Over and above the virtual classroom software, there may be a requirement for rooms setup with all required equipment (interactive white boards, audio and video) to enable training delivery for a combination of both physical and virtual classrooms,

 

Tip 12: Consider Connectivity

The LMS system needs to take into account that a number of people do not have access to the Internet in South Africa. Therefore:

  • The system must have an offline mode, to download the e-course, work on the course and upload when back online
  • Mobile device compatibility (e.g. tablet, smartphones)
  • Consider Technical System specifications

 

Tip 13: Consider whether you wish to have the system hosted at your premises or via a web application

  • Hosting: How will the solution be hosted
  • Will it be on premise within two data centres
  • How will it allow for service continuity
  • On what Operating system will be housed
  • What is the platform’s operating systems eg Windows Server 2012, § SUSE Linux,  Windows 10, Debian Linux, Ubuntu Linux or  SUSE Linux
  • What Database application will sbe used: SQL Server; or MySQL; or SQLite; or Redis
  • What Middleware will be used:
    • Rabbit MQ
    • Apache MQ
    • IBM MQ
    • Zero MQ
  • Web Browser
    • Internet Explorer
    • Microsoft EDGE
    • Firefox
    • Google Chrome
    • Safari
    • Mobile OS platform
    • IOS
    • Android

 

Tip 14: Consider whether your provider is South African and is Level 1 BBBEE

Learnership Meaning: Why learnerships are important?

This post provides a basic yet in-depth understanding of what a learnership is and why it is important.

It explains:

  • the difference between learnerships and internships
  • who qualifies for learnership
  • the advantages and disadvantages of learnerships
  • learnership rules
  • and lots more about learnerships

Before explaining what learnerships and internships mean and why they are important, it’s necessary to know that both learnerships and internships provide a structured platform for learning and gaining some exposure in the career field you choose to pursue.

What do Learnerships And Internships Mean and why they are important? What is the difference between Learnership and Internship?

What does an Internship mean?

  • An internship is a structured program that provides you with an exposure and working experience that aligns with your particular field of study.
  • The essence of an internship is to make you experience what a particular role feels like in a full-time working environment. An internship also facilitates your personal and career development.
  • One thing to note is that internships always have a specific timeframe allocated to them by an organization – one month, three months, six months, or even a year. An internship has an option for a part-time or full-time program. Also, an internship may be paid or unpaid.
  • Another thing to note about an internship is that it is taken up majorly by students and graduates in expectation to build more skills and acquire increased experience.

 

What does a Learnership mean?

  • Learnerships slightly differ from internships although both are used by organizations to develop individual skills and introduce real-life work experience.
  • A learnership is a more structured training program with both theoretical and practical elements that enables you to obtain the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) registered qualification without having received formal education from a tertiary institution.
  • In a nutshell, learnerships can be described as a well-structured learning program that enables participants to adequately acquire both practical skills and theoretical knowledge that earn them an NQF-registered qualification.  At the end of the learnership program, learners would receive a certificate that bears their qualification and their area of skill development.

Please note that to acquire an artisan equivalent qualification, which equals to NQF Level 4, a learner must have undergone and completed 4 different learnership programs (NQF Levels 1, 2, 3, and 4).

  • Although learnerships also have a specific timeframe and different durations, the average timeframe is about 18 months.
  • From the explanations above, it can be seen that learnerships enable you to gain the same theoretical knowledge, practical skills, and real-life working exposure achievable through internship but without undergoing formal education or having the qualification of a graduate.
  • Hence, the learnership program targets individuals and students who have GCSE as their highest educational qualification and helps them to acquire a national qualification while they work simultaneously.
  • While an internship can be said to be time-based, learnership can be said to be work-based, yet most learners are paid.

Who Qualifies For a Learnership?

Anybody between the ages of 16 and 35, and who has completed school, college or any training institutions qualifies for the learnership programs.

More so, unemployed South Africans are also qualified for learnership as long as there is an employer ready to provide them with the necessary work experience. In this case, the learner is legally bound by the contract between both parties (the learner and the employer). It is also required of the learner to be fully employed by the employer for only the specified period of the learnership program. However, at the expiration of the learnership program, the employer may decide to continue with the employment or not.

Learnership Rules

Note: Learnerships are managed by the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETA). There are 21 of these authorities and they all manage and oversee the registration of learnerships to meet the needs of skills development across the sectors.

These bodies also set out the basic requirements for the applicable learnership program. So, it is important to always find out from the relevant SETA about your chosen career path.

Also, since each learnership program ends in an NQF-registered qualification, a Learnership is designed to meet the necessary criteria for the NQF qualification laid out by the South African Qualification Authority (SAQA).

Even when you qualify for the learnership program, there are some learnership rules you need to observe and obey. Here are some of the basic rules:

  • After identifying the learnership program that suits and supports your career path, you must find out the basic and entry requirements for that specific learnership program.
  • Note that different learnership programs have different entry requirements. Therefore, you’re required to contact the prospective employer or training provider of the learnership program for full information or the specific requirements for your chosen learnership program.
  • You cannot register for more than one learnership program at a time with a SETA as each learner’s details and results are also stored on the National Learner Records Database for assessment and there must not be a duplicate record.
  • The minimum entry requirements for most learnership programs are computer literacy and the National Senior Certificate (NSC) or National Certificate (vocational). However, prospective learners may expect more specific skills requirements or subject requirements.

4 Advantages of Learnership

Learnership programs hold benefits for both the employer and the learner. Here are some of the advantages of learnership to both the learners and the employers:

4 Advantages of Learnership to Employers

  • Learnership involves on-the-job training. Hence, the employer will have a larger workforce to drive the productivity of the organization.
  • The employer will enjoy financial benefits. Foremost, SETA offer cash grants for learnership programs. Secondly, the government offers tax deduction and other incentives to employers for joining the learnership programs.
  • Employers/organizations earn points on the BBBEE scorecard for providing learnership training.
  • Learnership programs create skilled employees, who will, in turn, add value to the organization or support organizational growth and development.

Other benefits of the learnership training include:

  • National recognition. Learnership creates an avenue for further learning and because it’s registered on the NQF, it’s also recognized nation-wide.

4 Advantages of Learnership to Learners

  • Learners will still earn an income while undergoing learnership. This will not only motivate them but also enhance their career prospects.
  • Learners are given the opportunity for further learning and to obtain a national-recognized qualification that can be used across organizations.
  • Learnership creates an avenue for personal development and self-esteem improvement. This is especially true when a learner obtains a good qualification.
  • Learners don’t have to acquire formal education from a tertiary institution before participating in learnership.

4 Disadvantages of Learnership

Despite the interesting advantages of learnerships, they also have their disadvantages. Some of the disadvantages of learnerships include:

  • Learners are seen more as an assistant. Since learners are not yet skilled but only receiving on-the-job training, they are treated more like assistants than prospective employees. This may be considered as inequality.
  • Learners earn low salaries. Although learners earn an income during the learnership, this is a mere incentive and not a competitive payment that attracts talented individuals. Sometimes, learners may find themselves in a bad financial situation.
  • Learners get labeled. As long as they are undergoing the learnership program, they are given the title “learners.” This action may be patronizing and makes learners forfeit the necessary respect.
  • Learners may be made to do grunt works. Hence, they are made to perform menial or mindless tasks.

 

Learnership Obligations

Here are some learnership obligations required of both employers and learners:

An employer:

  • Must be registered and accredited as a workplace training provider with the appropriate Sector Education and Training Authority (SETA) in charge of the learnership.
  • Must select and recruit learners for the learnership program.
  • Must provide all the necessary skills, training, mentorship, supervision, and work experience needed by the learners for the particular learnership program.
  • Must allow the learner to attend appropriate and useful training.
  • Must ensure that the learner is easily assessable by any registered learnership evaluator.

A learner:

  • Must register with an organization/training provider for the learnership program.
  • Must be ready, willing, and available to participate in all the learning processes, learning sessions, and real-life work exposures (theoretical or practical) required by the learnership program.
  • Must participate in all induction programs
  • Must work diligently for the employer/organization as part of the learning process
  • Must comply with all the policies and procedures set up by the employer/organization/training provider.
  • Complete any assessment tool – logbooks, timesheets, etc. – provided by the employer/training provider.

Also, learners are required to sign two legal documents: the Learnership Agreement and the Employment Contract.

The learnership agreement is a document that contains the rights and responsibilities of the learner, the employer, and the training provider and must be signed by these three parties.

The employment contract is an agreement between the employer and the learner and must be signed with the employer. The employment contract is valid only for the timeframe of the learnership program.

While undergoing the learnership program, learners are required to complete learnership test questions, tasks, assignments, practical tests, and projects. All these tests, tasks, and projects will be formally evaluated both in the workplace and classroom.

How Much Does the Learnership Program Cost?

The following costs may be incurred during the learnership program where applicable:

  • Tuition costs
  • Professional registration fees
  • Learner allowances
  • Assessment costs

However, note that the program is generally funded by the relevant SETA. More so, the cost of a learnership program varies according to MERSETAs and also depends on the type of qualification to be acquired and levels of qualifications in view. Therefore, it is very important to always contact the relevant SETA for more and latest information.

Click the links below to view the learnerships BOTi offers:

 

 

 

 

 

How do you discipline yourself when working from home?

Top 10 tips on how to set up a home office and keep to a schedule of work during Coronavirus lockdown

So:  How do you discipline yourself when working from home?

How do you discipline yourself when working from home?

How do you discipline yourself when working from home?

While technology has given many of us the opportunity to work from home these days, and some of us have even become accustomed to occasional bouts of working remotely as the ‘new normal’, many people might find it unsettling and have no idea how to go about setting up a home office and keeping to a work routine in the absence of having a proper workplace structure during periods of Coronavirus lockdown.  Now, just about everyone whose jobs allow them to work from home will be doing so. So: How do you discipline yourself when working from home?  Here are some of our top tips to help you set up and manage your home office.

 

1. Claim your workspace

The first thing to do when setting up an office at home is to claim a dedicated workspace for yourself that will be free from unnecessary interruptions and afford you the space that you would have in a normal office. Even if it is a corner in your bedroom or living room, this space should be strictly reserved for work only. If you live with other people, it would be a good idea to set a few boundaries to restrict others from encroaching upon this space unless it is absolutely necessary.

 

2. Stay connected with your colleagues

A sense of loneliness and feeling out of the loop can quickly set in when you are working from home. Make it a part of your daily work routine to stay in touch with your colleagues on a regular basis. Even if it is a quick email or Whatsapp message. Better still, stay in touch via Skype or Zoom.  Even if you are not working on common projects with your colleagues, the more you stay connected the more you will feel like you are still part of the workforce.

 

3. Dealing with domestic distractions

Especially if you have children, it is not an easy task to separate work from domestic distractions. The urge to put in a load of washing while you are working on your laptop or see to the needs of others while you should be working is difficult to ignore. The trick here is to remind yourself that despite the fact that you are at home, you are also working and to try to discipline yourself to keep to your assigned tasks. You will feel a sense of achievement in getting work done at home when you are able to set schedules as well as boundaries and keep to them.

 

4. Make your workspace as comfortable as possible

Your normal office workspace is usually structured to be as comfortable as possible to maintain productivity. Yet, your home office may not come with ergonomically friendly furniture such as the adjustable swivel chair. Sitting at your desk for 8 hours a day can be taxing yet, sitting uncomfortably can have disastrous effects on your body and your stress levels. So, add a few cushions to your makeshift office chair and get settled in as comfortably as you can.

 

5. Take regular breaks

At work, you are usually entitled to a lunch break and regular tea breaks. Make it a point to take the same breaks at home as you would do if you were at work. That means, leaving your workspace entirely during these periods. Even if the only thing you can do is spend time in your garden, you need to take a dedicated break to split your day.

 

6. Communicate with your boss

Under normal circumstances you would spend a lot of your time in direct contact with your boss which means that communication is seamless. But, remote working means that communications can easily break down. It might also be the case that your manager has no experience working remotely either. The best way to tackle this problem is to stay in daily contact either telephonically or via email.

 

7. Don’t lounge around in your pyjamas

It is very tempting to lounge around in pyjamas while working from home. Yet, just because you can it doesn’t necessarily mean that you should. Get dressed and behave as though you were going to your ‘real job’ as it were and you will be surprised how this creates a shift in mindset that puts you into ‘work mode’.

 

8. Avoid any other unnecessary distractions

When you are at home with all your creature comforts around you it is not easy to work when you would rather be doing something else. The television, radio and other forms of home entertainment should be avoided during the ‘office hours’ that you set aside for yourself.

 

9. Set goals daily

If you were working on a regular home project you would have developed a timing plan and set appropriate goals to achieve it. The same applies to a work project carried out at home. As you would at the office, set your daily goals, make them realistic and dedicatedly work towards achieving them.

 

10. Eat properly to boost your immune system

When we are at work, in the daily rush of things it is often the case that we neglect to take good care of ourselves in eating properly. While working from home you have the time and opportunity to properly structure and control your diet and avoid unhealthy foods. This is a real bonus. Eat well and help build your immune system.

You might also enjoy:  How ready are you for the 4th Industrial Revolution?

 

Why should Learnerships be considered?

Overview of what Learnerships entail

Essentially, Learnerships encompass two main elements:

  • Theory
  • Relevant practical work experience

A Learnership is conducted over a specified time period which is usually 12 months.

There is a requirement for an agreement to be put in place between all parties to the Learnership which is referred to as a four-party agreement and is drawn up between the learner, the learner’s employer, the training services provider and the SETA.

Once a learner has successfully completed the Learnership and deemed to be competent, they will be awarded with a National Qualification.   If a learner has reached competence in only parts of a National Qualification then those credits towards the National Qualification will be awarded to the learner.

 

What is the context in which a Learnership can be pursued?

A Learnership towards a full National Qualification can be achieved in the following ways:

  • Full Training Learnership

A Full Training Learnership is pursued when the learner receives the full extent of the training required to complete the National Qualification and where the learner possesses little if any work experience or former training relevant to the National Qualification in question.

  • Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

The approach to a Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Learnership is carried out on the assumption that learning is in place based on former training and/or previous work experience.  The RPL Learnership is suitable for learners who are working in a certain capacity yet do not possess a qualification in the required field.  In the case where a learner has a certain degree of work experience and has already received training in various appropriate short courses the learner will not be required to undergo the full extent of the theoretical training component of the Learnership.  In this case a blended approach is applied using a combination of recognition of prior learning and the appropriate theoretical training in order to obtain the qualification.

 

Funded versus Unfunded Learnerships

Funded Learnerships

With funded Learnerships, a learner’s employer will submit an application for funding to the relevant SETA which funds will be allocated towards a full learnership qualification.  However, in this case there are two types of learnerships that can be applied for:

  • Unemployed Learnership

For unemployed Learnerships the employer would employ new staff on a temporary, permanent or contract basis.  In this regard the SETA will award funds which go towards supplementing the learner’s salary during the period of the Learnership and covering the training costs of the learner to complete the qualification.

 

  • Employed Learnership

An employed Learnership is appropriate when an employer needs existing staff members to obtain a formal qualification.

 

Unfunded Learnerships

Should there be a case whereby no funding for Learnerships is available from the SETA concerned an employer may opt for an unfunded Learnership.  In this case all costs of the Learnership will be borne by the employer.  Nevertheless, when a company enters into one a Learnership agreement with one or more learners companies qualify for a tax rebate upon the learners completing the qualification which can be offset against training and assessment costs.

 

Learnership Tax Implications

When employees undertake to complete a Learnership, an employer will qualify for a tax allowance based on an amount determined by SARS that is deducted from the company’s outstanding funds due to SARS.  An employer will qualify for this tax rebate regardless of whether the Learnership was funded by the relevant SETA.

 

Learnerships for Existing Employees

The employer is entitled to apply for a tax rebate when an existing employee undertakes a Learnership under the following circumstances:

  • At the commencement of the Learnership an allowance of R40 000 may be applied for.
  • Upon completion of the Learnership a further R40 000 can be applied for.

Hence, the amount claimed :  R80 000 x 28% (28% being the normal tax rate) = R22 400 which is deducted from the company’s amount owing to SARS per person completing the Learnership.  Since this is a tax deduction, companies will only benefit from the whole or parts of this deduction if they forecast to make taxable profits. Competence in the said Learnership does not need to achieved to qualify for this initial rebate.

These allowances are increased to R60 000 for learners with disabilities.

In the case of Learnerships that are less than 12 months, a pro rata portion of the allowance will be awarded irrespective of the reason for the Learnership not being completed during the 12 month period.

Should an employee leave the company prior to completing the Learnership the company is no longer required to reverse the amount of the allowance claimed upon commencement of the Learnership.

Case Study: Example of 100 employees undertaking a Learnership

The example below illustrates how R2 240 000 (R22 400 x 100) is deducted from the company’s tax amount owed to SARS

This tax saving is achieved by calculating the taxable amount of income of a company with and without the tax deduction of the Learnership.  Therefore, the difference between the two taxable amounts represents the company’s actual tax saving.  To illustrate this calculation let’s assume that a company achieves a R40 million revenue and its total expenses and deductions amount to R10 million.  If the company deploys 100 Learnerships for abled learners the company’s tax saving is calculated in the following manner:

 

Without Learnerships With Learnerships
R40 m = Revenue R40m= Revenue
minus R10 m= Expenses Minus R10m  = Expenses
Minus R8 000 = Learnership Tax Rebate
R30m = Taxable Profits R22m= Taxable Profits
Tax Payable Tax Payable
R30m x 28% = R8.4m R22m x 28% = R6.16m
When running 100 Learnerships the actual tax saving is:
R8.4m – R6.16m= R2.24m

 

Since this benefit is deducted as opposed to paid back, often, companies do not realize this important benefit.  If you use our example of the R2 240 000 tax deduction in the case where the company did not enter into any Learnership agreements the company would need to forfeit this amount to SARS.

Companies who do not obtain funds for Learnerships from one of the SETAS may nevertheless put employees on an unfunded Learnership program even though they will need to pay for the training through a training services provider.   Such funds may be  offset by the tax rebate.

 

Learnership Benefits

Some of the benefits of a Learnership are highlighted as follows:

  • A Learnership affords the opportunity for employees to obtain a national qualification while they are working which they may not have been able to afford to do in their own time or at their own expense.
  • When employees are given recognition for their experience and the opportunity to upskill this results in increased levels of morale and job satisfaction.
  • Studies reveal that the employee attrition rate is reduced when employees are given the opportunity to complete a Learnership.
  • Employee morale is boosted when the company is prepared to invest in their training and development.
  • Completing a Learnership provides a solid platform from which individuals can further develop themselves.
  • Significant savings and tax rebates can be achieved.
  • Tax rebates can be used to offset any additional training costs and can also be put towards the annual training budget allocation.
  • Learnerships in certain instances can reduction in a reduction in Skills Development levies.

The learnership may be subject to further benefits under the Employment Tax Incentive.

 

 

 

BBBEE Benefits

In terms of the Generic BBBEE Scorecard, Skills Development component is a key priority.  It carries 20 points plus an additional 5 bonus points.  The number and spend on Learnerships for designated groups can contribute substantially towards increasing one’s BBBEE Score.

BOTi offers Learnerships in respect of the following qualifications:

Learnerships – Qualifications

*National Certificate:  Generic Management *Further Education and Training Certificate:  Generic Management
SAQA ID 59201 SAQA ID 57712
NQF Level 05 NQF Level 04
Credits:  162 Credits:  150
Accredited Accredited
Course Duration:  30 days over 12 months Course Duration:  30 days over 9 – 12 months
National Certificate:  Management General Education and Training Certificate:  Business Practice
SAQA ID 83946 SAQA ID 61755
NQF Level 03 NQF Level 01
Credits:  120 Credits:  121
Accredited Accredited
Course Duration:  24 contact days over 12 months Course Duration:  24 contact days over 12 months
National Certificate:  New Venture Creation (SMME) Further Education and Training Certificate:  New Venture Creation
SAQA ID 49648 SAQA ID 66249
NQF Level 02 NQF Level 04
Credits:  138 Credits:  149
Accredited Accredited
Course Duration:  24 contact days over 12 months Course Duration:  30 contact days over 9 – 12 months
*National Certificate:  Business Administration Services *Further Education and Training Certificate: Business Administration Services
SAQA ID 23833 SAQA ID 61595
NQF Level 02 NQF Level 04
Credits:   120 Credits:  140
Accredited Accredited
Course Duration:  24 contact days over 12 months Course Duration:  20 contact days over 12 months
*National Certificate:  Business Administration Services Further Education and Training Certificate:  Project Management
SAQA ID 67465 SAQA ID 50080
NQF Level 03 NQF Level 04
Credits:  120 Credits:  136
Accredited Accredited
Course duration:  30 contact days over 9 – 12 months Course Duration:  24 contact days over 12 months
 

National Certificate: Information Technology:

End User Computing

SAQA ID 61591

NQF Level 03

Credits:  130

Accredited

Course duration:  30 contact days over 12 months

 

 

*Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Learnership Qualification Programs

 

 

Black Lives Matter in the workplace – human:  handle with care

 

The courier van pulled into the driveway of our Sandton office.  A man got out of the car carrying a very heavy parcel that was labelled:  Fragile:  handle with care.  No one knew what was in the parcel at that point but because it was covered with cautionary labelling, my receptionist carefully carried it into the office and brought it to me.  Such is human nature.  When something is heavily labelled, people will either diligently obey those instructions, make a mockery of them or disregard them entirely, which often results in less than desirable consequences.

Human – handle with care

No matter how they appear, human beings shouldn’t have to be labelled for us to handle them with care.  Treating people with care and respect should be an automatic response.  But this is not always the case.  Particularly in the workplace, with people from all walks of life who come from a whole host of diverse backgrounds and cultures.  The sad reality is that even in this day and age, discrimination, whether it be racism or sexism, is still rife in the workplace.

Workplace discrimination

Here we examine some of the more common incidents of racial discrimination in the workplace.

Direct Racial Discrimination

Direct racial discrimination takes place when someone is compromised because they happen to be of a different colour or cultural background.  To illustrate, let’s take the scenario of a lady of colour who applies for a job as a receptionist at a doctor’s consulting rooms in a predominantly white area.  While she meets the requirements of the job, after the interview the employer tells her that she probably wouldn’t ‘fit in’.  Instead, a white lady with similar skills is hired in her place.

Indirect Racial Discrimination

Indirect racial discrimination occurs when a policy or rule as laid down by an employer puts certain individuals from particular racial or cultural groups at a disadvantage.  For example, a man whose native language is Xhosa, applies for a position as an account executive at a marketing agency.  While the Xhosa speaking gentleman is fully bilingual and meets all the other requirements of the job, he is told that he does not qualify for the job because he is not a ‘native English speaker’.

Racial Harassment

Forms of racial harassment are varied.  Hence, they are not confined to merely passing offensive comments or insulting behavior.  Racial harassment can also include undesirable conduct in terms of a person’s race, especially where this results in violating a person’s dignity, thereby creating a toxic environment.   To cite an example, a Muslim gentleman is working as an administrator in a Local Government department.  His line manager constantly passes negative comments on his dress and general appearance and questions him about Islamic customs and culture.  As time goes on, the Muslim gentleman starts to feel as though his place of work is nothing short of intimidating and even hostile.

Workplace Victimization

Workplace victimization also comes in many forms and guises.  Let’s look at the case of a lady who has taken her case of victimization to a court of law after being racially abused by a group of colleagues.  Prior to the hearing, a number of her colleagues stop engaging with her and her manager puts her on probation.  This form of victimization appears as a direct result of her decision to take action against the perpetrators but also flies in the face of her trying to defend herself against racial discrimination.

How sexism plays out in the workplace

Sexism in the workplace is another serious issue that employers need to constantly monitor.   While we may no longer be living in a patriarchal society, sexism is still nevertheless rife in today’s workplace and can manifest in very distinct ways.

Insulting comments disguised as jokes

Insulting comments disguised as jokes is one of the most frequently occurring forms of sexual harassment in the workplace experienced by both men and women alike and can manifest as sexist remarks or jokes of an insulting nature based on gender.  For example, a male colleague telling his female counterpart to wear revealing clothing when seeing a client to ensure a better chance of sealing a deal.  This is not only completely demeaning to the woman concerned, but also infers that the only way to secure the outcome is to do so by using one’s ‘womenly wiles’ as it were.

Undermining the views of women

Undermining the views of women usually takes place when men engage in behaviours such as ‘talking over a woman’s head’ or over-explaining things as though women have absolutely no knowledge or expertise,  thus making women feel as though their views and opinions have little sway or value and ultimately go ‘unheard’ unless they are backed up by the man’s expertise.

Stereotyping of male versus female roles

Stereotyping of roles makes assumptions of the suitability of an individual to perform tasks based on gender.  For instance, comments such as ‘men don’t make good hairdressers’ or ‘would you trust a woman mechanic?’  have no basis in fact.

Sexism based on physical appearance

Sexism based on physical appearance involves comments made about dress, body shape or size and other physical characteristics over competence and skill.  For instance, comments such as ‘how could I concentrate on that lady’s presentation, did you see what she was wearing?

How should businesses respond to incidents of workplace discrimination?

Workplace discrimination is a hugely disruptive force for any company to deal with.  To minimize and fully understand the implications associated with discrimination in any form, businesses should be cognizant of the fact that from the point of view of the individuals concerned, incidents of racial or sexual discrimination can be extremely traumatic, emotional and offensive.  In light of this, businesses need to take these matters seriously and assign every possible resource to ensure that employees feel safe in the workplace and that they are treated with respect.  One way of effectively managing diversity in the workplace is to ensure that employees are given the right training such as Workplace Diversity Training.

What needs to be entrenched in the culture of a company is to ensure that the Code of Conduct is regularly referred to.   All employees need to understand and be aware of the ramifications of any indiscriminate behaviours around sexual harassment or racial discrimination.

In terms of best practice, businesses need to swiftly document any complaints of racial discrimination, meet with the individuals concerned and closely monitor the outcomes of any investigations.  It is often the case that employees feel unsafe and less than comfortable working with other parties against whom incidents have been lodged, and in this regard it is extremely important that companies put necessary measures in place to ensure that victims of harassment feel safe in the workplace.  If the individuals concerned do not feel comfortable options such as transferring the harasser away from those who feel victimized should be considered.  It is also vital that employers monitor the frequency and nature of any complaints lodged.

 

Hayley Gillman

CEO, Business Optimization Training Institute

 

Hayley Gillman talks to Business Insider on workplace discrimination:

Human Creativity: The critical survival skill of the 4th Industrial Revolution – how ready are you?

How ready are you for the 4th Industrial Revolution?

Only two decades into the 21st Century and the way of the world is fraught with change in light of the impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution as we move further into an era where the distinction between man and machine is becoming less and less obvious.

The way we live, the way we work and the way we think are all going through changes as the new technologies deploy into our homes and places of work.

What does the 4th Industrial Revolution involve?

The 4th Industrial Revolution has a broad signature across many different fields with technology breakthroughs in numerous disciplines including:

  • Fully autonomous vehicles
  • Robotics
  • The Internet of Things
  • Industrial Internet of Things (IIOT)
  • Fifth-generation wireless technologies (5G)
  • Additive manufacturing/3D printing

The 4th Industrial Revolution is different from the previous three eras in that instead of being marked by technological advances, it is concerned rather with advances in communication and connectivity. Such technologies hold the potential to further connect billions more people to the web and significantly enhance business and organizational efficiencies as well as helping to regenerate the environment using improved asset management techniques.

The Fourth Doctor

Dr WHO is not some health official from the World Health Organization famous for mucking around with petrie dishes in the WHO laboratories in search of a cure for COVID-19 in the year 2020.   Nor, as his other name, ‘The Fourth Doctor’ suggests, is he a mad scientist from the future who is controlling humanity using 4th Industrial Revolution technologies.  In truth, he is just a Time Lord from the UK classic science fiction series Dr WHO that first aired in 1963, and no, he is not plotting to destroy the human race.  Yet, the very sound of the name Dr WHO smacks of an evil character from a World Health Organization conspiracy theory story involving a character that instead of preserving the human race is hell bent on killing us all off.  Such is the flair of human creativity, as this story illustrates; that is, to create a stage that stimulates the imagination and takes us on an endless journey towards exploring the potentials of the human condition.

Figure 1:  Dr Who (The Fourth Doctor)

 

Ask anyone who has a business degree whether they think creativity is important in the grand scheme of their pursuits and you will more than likely be met with a response such as, ‘no, surely creativity belongs to the the realm of artists, musicians and graphic designers?’  In the past, this may very well have held true.  Yet, today, creativity is not only about putting paint to canvas.

 

Covid-19 is responsible for accelerating the pace of the adoption of 4IR technologies and the need for creative problem-solving

 In light of recent events, it goes without saying that Covid-19 is responsible for accelerating the pace of the widespread adoption of 4th Industrial Revolution technologies.  Since, it is estimated that more than 7 billion people worldwide have been subjected to severe restrictions of movement during phases of lockdown in the past few months and systems that have for decades resisted change are now forced into going virtual.  Businesses from all economic sectors are applying creative problem-solving techniques in ways never seen before and are developing new technical solutions using digital technologies and revamping their business models at a rate that would have been inconceivable only months ago.  This brings to our attention the fact that 4IR technologies are now crucial to our very survival.

 

Human creativity is driving 4th Industrial Revolution Technologies

So, what does creativity have to do with any of these things?  For starters, we need to bear in mind that while 4th Industrial Revolution technologies are fast becoming the way to go in the world of the ‘new normal’, they are driven by something far superior to robots – human creativity.  And in recent times humans are applying their creative problem solving skills to using these technologies to kit us out for survival in the new era.

 

The Internet of Things (IOT)

Social distancing means that never before has there been more of a need for us to rely on the Internet of Things (IOT) to perform daily tasks such as staying in contact with others and working remotely.  Zoom has never before known such fame, with many individuals using the cloud-based videotelephony and online chat services platform for teleconferencing, distance education, telecommuting and social interactions.

 

3D Printing

To help protect frontline medical staff, manufacturing firms and hobbyists alike are using 3D printing technology to make thousands of face shields.

 

Machine Learning

Machine learning is being used by both researchers and medics alike to search repositories of scholarly articles pertaining to Covid-19.

 

Artificial Intelligence helps in the fight against Covid-19

According to a recent report by Euronews.com part of a research project in pursuit of identifying potentially new molecules that could be used for drugs against the coronavirus sees European scientists using Artificial Intelligence and High Performance Computing by combining algorithms, biochemistry and molecular screenings to help in the fight against Covid-19.

 

Robots with a penchant for fast foods

According to the Wall Street Journal, about a year ago McDonald’s already began rolling out testing of voice-activated drive-thrus and deep-frying robots that cook fries, chicken and fish.  Today, such technologies are not just about saving costs but preserving the human condition in the face of containing the spread of coronavirus and such innovations, rather than putting people out of jobs, are expected to enable McDonald’s staff to work on their soft skills such as customer service and teamwork.  Employees are shifting away from doing basic tasks such as taking orders since technologies such as self-order kiosks, robotics and AI will take over these basic tasks to enable employees to concentrate more on customer service.

 

 

The Rolling Stones Zoom music to my ears

Even creatives themselves can be 4IR savvy when streaming their performances from home studios.  In their One World:  Together at Home concert in April the Rolling Stones performed one of their classic tracks, “You can’t always get what you want” online and delivered to a global audience via Zoom.

 

Understanding the Importance of Human Creativity in the 4th Industrial Revolution

According to The World Economic Forum, Deloitte as well as McKinsey, creativity is in the top 3 of the most sought after skills needed to survive the 4th Industrial Revolution since it is a cognitive skill that simply cannot be automated.  In fact, McKinsey estimates that it is now even more important than complex information processing and interpretation and advanced literacy and writing skills in that it is anticipated that the demand for skills involving a high degree of creativity will further increase by approximately 14 percent in Europe and 19 percent in the United States in the near future.

 

The 4th Industrial Revolution brings along with it a whole host of new technologies and sophisticated products and as a result, changes in the workplace to such an extent that will require both creative thinking and creative problem-solving skills.

Creative thinking

Creative thinking involves generating original ideas and unique ways of solving problems.

 

Creative problem-solving

Creative problem solving is concerned with solving issues that pose numerous possible solutions and how to determine the best way forward given these different variables.

 

Hollywood may not be the place to hold a psychic convention but science fiction still has an uncanny knack of predicting the future

 

“Psychic spies from China try to steal your mind’s elation

An’ little girls from Sweden dream of silver screen quotation

And if you want these kind of dreams, it’s Californication..’

 

                                                                                  Red Hot Chilli Peppers – Californication

 

Let’s go back to the future and take a look at the light and dark sides of some of Hollywood’s notorious Artificial Intelligence characters

Turning our attention back towards science fiction, it is also commonly believed that science fiction writers and Hollywood producers have seemingly more often than not had an uncanny knack of predicting the future.  And anticipating what it may be like to work with AI colleagues in the future brings to mind some of Hollywood’s most notorious AI characters.

 

R2D2 and C3PO

Life will be just fine if you happen to be in a good position with your AI counterparts.   Lucky Luke Skywalker of Star Wars fame was indeed fortunate in that two of his best friends were robots who went by the names of R2D2 and C3PO (first appeared onscreen in 1977).  These robots did whatever was necessary to aid Luke, helping him to fight off nasties such as the Storm Troupers.

 

 

HAL 9000

HAL 9000 is the main antagonist in Arthur C Clarke’s Space Odyssey series and is portrayed as an artificial intelligence character.  Hence, in the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey, a system known as HAL (Heuristically Programmed Algorithmic Computer) is a sentient computer or form of AI (artificial intelligence) that interacts with the crew of the Discovery One spacecraft and controls the ship’s systems.  As well as maintaining the ship’s systems while on an interplanetary mission, amongst other things, HAL is also capable of speech and speech recognition, natural language processing, lip reading, facial recognition, automated reasoning, interpreting emotional behaviours, spacecraft piloting and playing chess.  However, something goes wrong and HAL ends up turning against his human counterparts and tries to kill off the ship’s crew members.

 

 

Who is Dr WHO?

 

As mentioned earliier, Dr WHO is not the Fourth Doctor from the 4th Industrial Revolution nor is he an official from the World Health Organization but rather he is a Time Lord who fulfills the critical role of fighting off a robot-like army of cyborg aliens known as the DALEKS.

 

WHO WE ARE

 

But, as we move forward in the world of the ‘new normal’, irrespective of what stage we are at, or what stage Hollywood will do justice to when the film industry is allowed to start shooting again, WHO WE ARE, as creative human beings, will undoubtedly be what saves us from one day being controlled by a world run by machines.

 

 

Helen Fenton, Senior Analyst:  Business Optimization Training Institute (BOTi) www.boti.co.za

 

References sources:

  1. World Economic Forum (WEF) Future of Jobs Report 2018
  2. Wikipedia
  3. Newswise.com
  4. Euronews.com
  5. Eater.com
  6. Restaurantdive.com

 

Business Optimization Training Institute (BOTI) is a Johannesburg based, Level 1 BBBEE business.  As a Services and MICT SETA accredited company, we have trained thousands of individuals from over 650 companies and our extensive course offering consists of Short Courses, Soft Skills Training and Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Learnership Programs.  In addition, we offer bespoke training programs designed to cater to specific business needs.  Our training courses are focused on knowledge and skills transfer and we pride ourselves in being able to provide training anytime, anywhere across South Africa.

Machines in control

How the technologies of the 4th Industrial Revolution will influence the world as we know it post Coronavirus

The digital journey and lessons from history

The general tone around taking a history lesson is often met with reactions such as, why is this important, how does it affect me and why should I care about what century it was when people stopped wearing swords?    Truth be told, yes, we should care and yes, while people stopped wearing swords and sidearms and ceased from decapitating one another in the late 18th Century, the truth is that these days we are wearing a different kind of sword – double-edged and mighty.

“Technology is a bit of a double-edged sword.  Used right, it’s a wonderful tool but unfortunately, it makes it easier for a lot of mediocre people to get really crappy ideas out.”

                                                                                                                                                   Martin Gore

Age sometimes has its advantages.  While the tendency of mainstream society is to lean towards embracing the ideas of the fresh, innocence of youth to inspire growth and change, there are those who have lived a lot longer and seen and experienced a great deal more in terms of how the world has changed and how technologies have moved us forward in the past few decades.  And these individuals, from the Baby Boomer and Generation X age groups have a great deal of historical knowledge, much to teach and carry the accolades as the creators of the technologies that we use today.  Hence, the history of the forces that have since shaped the Digital Revolution are told by those who are not merely users but ‘creators.’

The advent of the Digital Revolution

The Digital Revolution, also known as the 3rd Industrial Revolution has its roots in and refers to the shift from mechanical and analogue electronic technology to digital electronics and began in the late 1950s through to the 1970s with the widespread adoption and use of digital computers and digital record keeping.

At the core of this revolution lies mass production and the extensive use of digital logic, MOSFETS or MOS transistors and integrated circuit (IC) chips along with their associated technologies that include computers, microprocessors, digital cellular phones and the Internet.  Hence, these technologies are responsible for transforming traditional production and business techniques during the latter half of the 20th Century.

Digital immigrants versus digital natives

Some of those Baby Boomers and Generation Xers might not be the creators of the Digital Revolution and did not grow up with these technologies.  Yet, the early adopters and dedicated users of digital technologies of these generations have come to be known as ‘digital immigrants’ and these individuals have paved the way for the birth of the next generation of people who have been born into the machine age and have rightly been termed ‘digital natives’ since they have no idea what the world would be like in the absence of technology.  These digital natives, born after 1982, belong to the next generation, the Millennials.

The rise of the machines

Let’s take a look at the forerunners of the machines that are controlling our lives today and when and how they first came into being.

The Typewriter – since 1860

As you are reading this article you are scrolling and clicking and typing on an everyday computer, laptop or phone using the QWERTY keyboard which has been in use since 1860 with the invention of the typewriter.

The Telephone – since 1876

As you are scrolling through your mobile phone, take a moment to reflect back to almost a hundred and fifty years ago, when, In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone.

The Television – since 1926

While you are changing channels with the remote control and checking to see what will be showing, take yourself back in time to the year 1926 when the television first became commercially available.  At that time a ‘television set’ was an expensive item and very few individuals could afford one and in 1940 a commercially-produced RCA electronic television cost in the region of USD200 – USD600 which equates to approximately USD3 600 to USD10 800 at 2019 prices.

The Laptop – since 1975

In September of 1975 IBM released the first laptop computer, the IBM5100.

Apple I and Apple II – since 1976

In 1976 Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs created their first Apple computer which sold for USD670 and a year later when investors began to see the potential of these machines the Apple II was released.

Digital Camera – since 1975

In 1975, Steven Sasson invented the world’s first digital camera while working at Eastman Kodak.  It was rather clumsy, weighing about 3.6kgs and shot pictures at only 0.01MP.

The Internet – since 1989

October 23 1989 was the day that the Internet went live, enabling thousands and soon after millions of individuals to connect worldwide.  By October 2005 one billion people were using the Internet worldwide.

Is the pen mightier than the sword?

And so it was, like any modern fairy tale that before the widespread use of technology became the norm, we may well remember that children learnt to read and write when they first began school.  These days, many chldren have a digital footprint by the age of two and instead they learn to tap and swipe before they learn to read and write.  World literacy rates have risen considerably in the past couple of hundred years.  In 1820, only 12% of the world’s population could read and write.  Whereas, nowadays only 14% of people in the world are illiterate.   Computer literacy world averages, as determined by The World Economic Forum found that the OECD countries are not as computer literate as one would expect since 25% of individuals don’t know how to use a computer, at least 45% rate poorly and only 30% rate as moderately to strongly computer literate.  (Ourworldindata.org)

These stats are frightening when we consider that the accelerated changes brought about by the technologies of the 4th Industrial Revolution mean that you will not be able to do much going forward if you are not connected to the Internet.

The Internet is our lifeline to the outside world

The interesting thing is that the 4th Industrial Revolution involves the fusion of technologies that is responsible for blurring the lines between physical, digital and biological spheres that are collectively known as cyber-physical systems.  This might sound a little like Star Trek but truth be told, our relationships with our machines have become critical to our survival.  Thus, we depend on Google to answer our questions and we rely on the Internet to do our jobs, chat with others and even attend school and training courses.

The Technologies of the 4th Industrial Revolution

To sum up the technologies of the 4th Industrial Revolution we need to understand that these technologies have a broad signature across many different fields with technology breakthroughs in numerous disciplines that include:

  • Fully autonomous vehicles
  • Robotics
  • The Internet of Things
  • The Industrial Internet of Things (IIOT)
  • Fifth-generation wireless technologies (5G)
  • Additive manufacturing/3D printing

Yet, the 4th Industrial Revolution is different from the previous eras in that instead of being marked by advances in technology it is concerned rather with advances in communication and connectivity.

Power up with the remote control of life post COVID-19

Until recently, the only remote control was a device for changing channels on the television.  But, social-distancing and quarantine in the face of COVID-19 has seen most of us using technology to work remotely, stay in touch with friends and relatives, conduct school classes and adult based education.  Yet, so many people are not computer literate enough to embrace these technologies, let alone live by them.  The question then arises as to how we will bridge the gaps to bring the world up to speed with technologies that are our lifeline to the outside world in a post- Covid-19 world where machines are in control.

Reference sources:  World Economic Forum, Ourworldindata.org

 

Learning Management System (LMS) Installed Overnight & Preloaded with up to 140 Courses for all your staff

Yes we have heard you – In response to COVID-19, BOTI – your trusted Level 1 BBBEE training partner – is offering E-Learning access to our customers

Rapid implementation of:

  • Cost-effective E-learning during difficult Covid times.
  • Home learning
  • Prepare for the ‘new normal’
  • Publish your own material on the platform or request us to write specific materials
  • Be safe in these Corona/Covid times

See if this is suitable for your company:  Get free voucher now

No Upfront-Costs

For the next three months, BOTI is offering this service to companies on a sliding scale basis (with no upfront costs):

Package starts from 25 users (R2 250 (ex Vat) per month for access to a choice of 25 Courses.

  • Additional users can be added at R30 per month.
  • Access to Additional Coures for all students can be added at R99 per month

If you are interested in a free 14 day (1 user, 7 Courses) no obligation trial or quote please click below:

Get  free 14 day trial voucher or get a quote

You can get access to up to 140 Courses…

Administrative Skills & Career Development/ HR
Archiving and Records Management
Business Writing
Executive and Personal Assistants
Managing Workplace Harassment
Talent Management
Emotional Intelligence
Job Search Skills
Managing Workplace Anxiety
Public Speaking
Stress Management
Boost Sales & Leadership Skills
Coaching Salespeople
Employee Recognition
Top 10 Sales Secrets
Supervisors And Managers
Developing New Managers
Knowledge Management
Leadership And Influence
Performance Management
Meeting Management
Diiversity and Inclusion
Computer & Technical Skills
Excel 2016 Essentials / Expert
Outlook 2016 Essentials
PowerPoint 2016 Essentials
Word 2016 Essentials / ExpertCreating a Great Webinar
Risk Assessment and Management
Lean Process And Six Sigma
Project Management
Negotiation Skills
Supply Chain Management
Virtual Team Building

 

We also offering Accredited E-learning for our 11 qualifications/learnerships and over 200 accredited unit standards. Click here to
request a quote.
 

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Fighting COVID 19 – Wellness  Assessment Questionnaire

Fighting COVID 19 – Wellness  Assessment Questionnaire

Signing this form indicates that you confirm that you are feeling well and that you do not have any of the following symptoms:  Headache / high temperature/fever / cough / sore throat / loss of smell / loss of taste.  Should you be suffering from any of these symptoms please either self-isolate at home or seek medical attention.

Signing this form also indicates that you confirm that that you have not recently been in contact with anyone who has tested positive for COVID-19.

 

    Temperature Passed test? Feeling Well?  
Date Name Temperature Reading Yes No Yes No Signature

Disclaimer:  Use of this form is at your own risk including the addition and modification of any fields where necessary.

Fighting COVID- 19: The BOTi guide to precautionary actions and procedures that need to be followed to guard against the virus upon returning to work

As COVID-19 lockdown restrictions start to ease over the next few weeks many businesses in various essential services sectors in South Africa will gradually start to return to the workplace.  But, while these restrictions may be lifting, we still cannot afford to lift the lid entirely on things as we gradually make the shift towards recovery.  Here are some brief guidelines to help guide you.

  • Important: If you have the following symptoms:

    • Feeling unwell
    • Feeling tired
    • Coughing
    • Headache
    • Fever or high temperature

SIMPLY DO NOT RETURN TO WORK!!!

You should:

  • Wear a face mask at all times.
  • Practise social distancing at all times. This also applies to using company vehicles where a maximum of two people should be allowed in the vehicle at a time.
  • Avoid gathering in the canteen or dining area. Instead eat outside and maintain a 2 metre distance from the next person at all times.
  • Reduce the number of meetings where physical contact takes place to an absolute minimum and hold online meetings/discussions instead.
  • Limit the number of persons using the toilet area to 3 people at a time.
  • Keep hands sanitised at all times with alcohol based sanitiser or soap and water but especially:
    • Upon entering the workplace
    • Upon exiting the workplace
    • Prior to eating or drinking
    • After eating or drinking
    • Before using the toilet
    • After using the toilet
  • You should let your employer know immediately should you become aware that someone you have recently been in contact with has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • Prior to entering the workplace, each staff member is required to have their forehead temperature checked. If you have a high temperature you should return home or seek medical assistance immediately.
  • Prior to entering the workplace, each staff member is required to complete and sign a ‘Wellness Assessment Questionaire’. Should the questionnaire reveal that you are not 100% well, return home or seek medical assistance immediately.
  • Should you at any stage test positive for COVID-19 inform your employer immediately and place yourself in self-isolation for at least 21 days.
  • If after testing positive for COVID-19 do not under any circumstances return to work until you are feeling better and test results are negative.

These guidelines also apply to customers or suppliers when visiting business premises.

 

Taking training matters into sanitised hands – 7 seconds is all it takes

Taking training matters into sanitised hands – 7 seconds is all it takes

To help curb the spread of the Corona Virus, 7 seconds is all it takes to reach for the sanitiser, clean the hands and wipe down the laptop and mobile phone.

While the world is on high alert to contain the spread of COVID-19, at Business Optimization Training Institute we are taking training matters into sanitised hands. How? You might ask. The short and simple answer is: By meeting your training and health and safety needs.

Social distancing and self-isolation don’t mean that every step that you are taking to fulfil your learning and development needs should come to a grinding halt. Since:

  • Now more than ever we can take advantage of virtual training platforms. If you are concerned about putting your staff at risk by exposing them to a classroom filled with people, don’t panic. We can meet your training needs by providing a virtual classroom.
  • Sanitisation – When entering the classroom, nothing and no one is left unsanitised. We uphold best-practise hygiene standards as laid down by the WHO (World Health Organisation).
  • Post-training follow-ups such as discussions and Q & A sessions can be conducted telephonically or online via a virtual platform.

Despite its physical consequences, we are also acutely aware of the effects that a global pandemic such as COVID-19 can have on one’s emotional and mental health.So, don’t feel isolated. We are here for you in many more ways than one.

 Simply follow the links below to view some of our Soft Skills training courses and book your seat on any Soft Skills training course before 30 April 2020 and receive a 10% discount.
Have you got 7 Seconds?  Click the image below

 

Human – handle with care 

Human – handle with care 

As we observe Human Rights Day in South Africa on 21st March, we realise that the fight for human rights is never over.

For, while the Bill of Rights is enshrined in our constitution and protects all South Africans from human rights infringements, there is still so much to consider around how we go about ensuring that we address issues such as education, housing and gender-based violence.

But, what of the business arena?

Many employees and employers alike are not as clued up as they should be when it comes to human rights in the workplace and in the words of the late great Bob Marley feel like ‘A Buffalo Soldier – fighting on arrival, fighting for survival’.

 

But, ignorance is not bliss in this case and one needs to be aware of what The Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA) dictates where employee rights are concerned. A brief heads up informs us that employees are entitled to certain minimum rights where it concerns their terms and conditions of employment. Amongst others, these rights include:

  • Remuneration for work done
  • Being entitled to vacation leave, sick leave, maternity leave and family responsibility leave
  • Remuneration for overtime worked
  • Lunch breaks
  • Daily and weekly rest periods
  • Public holidays
  • Allowances for night work
  • Written terms and conditions of employment
  • Salary advices

 

But, there is a great deal more to it than that and you don’t need to struggle to find the facts. Simply follow the links below to view some of our Human Resources Management training courses and book your seat on any Human Resources and Labour Relations training course before 31 March 2020 and receive a 10% discount. You can also take a look at all our public courses here or download our 2020 Training Catalogue right now!

Effectively Manage Human Resources and Labour RelationsWorkplace Violence Course

Workplace Harassment Course

Human Resources Management Course

Don’t struggle.  Click the image below to chill with the Buffalo Soldier!

Hardcore leaders succeeding with soft skills in a world where the only constant is change

 

Today’s workplace is fraught with change.  In fact, embracing change has become the norm.  So much so that as soon as change kicks in one can almost hear the gentle click and chug of the cogs that drive the wheels of progress just when one has started to settle in and get comfortable with people, places, systems and processes.  It is at that point that one needs to shift into a higher gear or run the risk of being left in the dust.

 

“It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.”

Charles Darwin

Leaders of the New Roaring Twenties and beyond need skills that were not even on the radar as recent as ten years ago

 

So what does that mean for the captain at the helm?  The leader who is responsible to ensure that their team is sufficiently equipped to handle whatever comes their way.  Lots.  To be a leader today entails a great deal more than managing by walking around, calling the shots and acting as a buffer against the tide.  On the contrary, as we embrace the new era of the 4th Industrial Revolution with its associated technologies that are primarily responsible for driving most of the change that we see in the world today, the leaders of the New Roaring Twenties and beyond need to equip themselves with a whole host of critical skills that were not considered to be that important and not even on the radar as recently as only ten years ago.

 

The fast trending discipline of ‘soft skills’ as critical skills for the 4th Industrial Revolution

 

Whether one is an engineer or a banker, technical skills and qualifications are the ‘hard skills’ needed for one to be accepted into any profession. Yet, regardless of what profession or discipline one is involved in, the skills one needs to lead a team in successful pursuit of organisational goals and objectives are fast trending into a discipline of their own and have come to be known under the banner of ‘soft skills’.  These soft skills are a major topic of interest where it concerns the World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs Report 2018.   It is these soft skills that now define the borders between a truly effective leader who is enthusiastic and engaged and one who is by all intents and purposes doing everything by the book, yet, is missing the mark at every turn.  The list of these ‘soft skills’ is rapidly growing as we constantly shift and evolve.  Let us now examine some of the main ones that will define the successful leaders of the New Roaring Twenties as we embrace the era of the 4th Industrial Revolution.

 

The Spirit of Resilience

 

Since the only constant we can rely on in the workplace of today is change, a good leader should adopt a spirit of resilience.  Individuals who are resilient are more often than not resourceful as well as agile and flexible.  As the landscape of the workplace shifts and changes, such individuals embrace change and adapt to what is happening around them regardless.  In other words, they have the ability to bounce back in a true spirit of resilience and are the ones that others look to when they become afraid.  An effective leader will acknowledge anxieties and fears and will find ways to relieve anxieties, assuage fears and boldly take risks to meet new challenges.

 

A high degree of Emotional intelligence (EQ)

 

In the last century and as recently as only twenty years ago, when we crossed the gap into the 21st Century, success was thought to be determined by the fact that one possesses a high IQ.  Today, nothing could be further from the truth.  While a high IQ will get you your banking or engineering qualifications it will do nothing for you if, at the other end of the scale, your EQ or Emotional Quotient is not up to scratch.  The truth is that while one might not be born with a high degree of emotional intelligence the good news is that it can be learnt and like anything else, practise makes perfect.  Emotionally intelligent leaders are the ones that constantly strive to understand why employees behave the way that they do, for example, as a result of a bad experience, a lack of trust or fear.  An understanding of this principle makes it easier to deal with any type of situation with poise and confidence.

 

Responding with Empathy

 

Responding to a situation with empathy enables leaders to better understand their employees as well as their customers.  That often means putting themselves into the shoes of others as well as being able to work their way into the hearts, minds and souls of the people.  This is par for the course in today’s leadership landscape and is often how a good leader will go about rallying the troupes to live, breathe and execute on their vision.

 

Passion and enthusiasm

 

When new to the task of leadership passion and enthusiasm are the spark to the flame, and form part of a cluster of electrifying qualities that are either present in the behaviour of a leader or completely missing in action. Since, often, when a lacklustre climate exists in the workplace, it is because these qualities are conspicuous by their absence in that the general vibe around what the leader puts out there is generally uninspiring, lacks vitality and the life force seems to have withered away.  True passion for a business, its products or services and its vision and mission is almost palpable.  Employees can spot a leader who is sincerely passionate and enthusiastic a mile away and the spin off effect is that these qualities are completely contagious and anyone who has worked with a passionate leader will attest to the fact that in more cases than most it is the passion itself that is the driving force behind the success of the business.

 

Acting with Integrity

 

It is an undisputable fact that leaders who act with integrity will engender trust amongst colleagues and their direct reports.  On the other hand, leaders who do not value integrity will not get buy-in from their teams which negatively impacts employee engagement and eventually erodes the bottom-line performance of the business.  Leading with integrity does not necessarily mean that mistakes don’t occur.  What it does mean is having the courage to own up to those mistakes when they do occur, thereby fostering a spirit of humility.  Those who lead with integrity also recognise that no one is perfect and that self-development, especially in a professional capacity, is an ongoing process.

Leaders that will succeed in the new era of the 4th Industrial Revolution

 

In summing up the essence of the importance of ‘soft skills’ in the workplace of the 4th Industrial Revolution, it goes without saying that individuals are more likely to follow the lead of someone who is a likeable boss.  Viewed from this perspective, the leaders that will succeed in the new era of the 4th Industrial Revolution are those who are naturally more approachable, friendly, well-spoken and demonstrate maturity and sincerity towards others.

 

Helen Fenton, Senior Analyst:  Business Optimization Training Institute (BOTi) www.boti.co.za

Business Optimization Training Institute (BOTI) is a Johannesburg based, Level 1 BBBEE business.  As a Services and MICT SETA accredited company, we have trained thousands of individuals from over 700 companies and our extensive course offering consists of Short Courses, Soft Skills Training and Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Learnership Programs.  In addition, we offer bespoke training programs designed to cater to specific business needs.  Our training courses are focused on knowledge and skills transfer and we pride ourselves in being able to provide training anytime, anywhere across South Africa.

 

 

Feeling like a castaway? Need a coach or mentor but no response to your SOS on SMS? Don’t send a message in a bottle, no man or woman is an island, we’re on to it!

The news that a message in a bottle has been found floating in the ocean or washed up on a beach conjures up the idea that someone must have gone to a great deal of effort to get their message out there

Some interesting facts about the message in a bottle:

  • Messages in bottles have been used since time immemorial to send distress signals, monitor ocean currents and carry letters to loved ones from those stranded at sea.
  • The Greek Philosopher Theophrastus was the first to send a message in a bottle in 310 B.C. by tossing it into the Mediterranean Sea as part of an experiment. Ever since, people have often relied on the oceans to get the word out in times of distress.
  • Invitations to prospective pen pals and letters to actual or imagined love interests have also been sent as messages in bottles.
  • In 2005 a group of teenaged migrants were abandoned in a boat off the Costa Rica coast by the crew who was smuggling the passengers illegally. Without the aid of any typical means of modern communication the passengers placed a message in a bottle that read “Please help us” and cast it adrift on the ocean in the hope that it would soon be found. Fisherman subsequently discovered the bottle and delivered it to a nearby World Heritage site island. The island staff notified their headquarters and the castaways were rescued and taken to the island to recuperate.

Coaching towards success   

  • Coaching allows you to define your career goals in a realistic way. With the assistance of a coach, you can set these goals and then actively work towards them

 

  • Having a coach gives you a safe space to go and talk through sensitive issues
  • Through coaching you can learn more about yourself, discover more about how others perceive you and improve aspects of your personality that you are not satisfied with

So, if right now you are looking for that extra little bit of attention and are wondering whether you need some coaching and mentoring don’t hit the bottle  

Simply follow the links below to view some of our Coaching and Mentoring training courses and book your seat on any Coaching and Mentoring course before 31 March 2020 and receive a 20% discount. You can also take a look at all our public courses here or download our 2020 Training Catalogue right now!

Got the message?  Click the image below to get in tune with it

 

Is your fear of Excel greater than your fear of flying? Has Excel become the bad guy in your life? If so, then sum-thing good is about to happen….

Is your fear of Excel greater than your fear of flying? Has Excel become the bad guy in your life? If so, then sum-thing good is about to happen….

So, if:

• You think that Excel has become the bad guy in your life
• You start sweating every time someone mentions the dreaded ‘E’ word
• You think you are allergic to numbers
• The word ‘statistics’ causes you to break out into a nervous rash

Then:

There’s sum-thing you ought to know

The simple fact about Excel is that with it you can do a number of useful things such as automatically add up a list of invoice amounts, keep a running total of stock, calculate your business expenses over time or solve problems. Apart from business tasks, you can keep track of your personal affairs such as budgets, shopping lists, But, without it you might find yourself flailing blindly when the numbers just don’t add up.

And sum interesting stats

  • It is estimated that 2.5% to 6.5% of people worldwide suffer from aerophobia or what is commonly known as a fear of flying.
  • Research also reveals that an estimated one-third (that is 33.333%) of the industrial world is technophobic (suffering from a fear of technology) to a certain degree.
  • But, the real plus is that the fear of Excel is easier to conquer than the fear of flying and Excel phobia and technophobia at large can be overcome through formal training.

 

And sum useful tips for overcoming your fear of Excel

  • Remember, anyone who is adept at working with Excel spreadsheets was taught by someone at some stage.
  • Everyone who uses Excel started with a blank spreadsheet.
  • Study one function at a time before you move on to the next one.
  • You don’t need to know the purpose of every single function of Excel. Only use the ones you need.
  • Practise. Practise. Practise.

And sum-thing else you ought to know is that no one is born an Excel expert but we can help you become an Excel tough guy.

So, don’t hit a blank when you see a blank spreadsheet and wonder what the heck to do with it. Excel is not the bad guy. Let us help you become an Excel tough guy. Simply follow the links below to view some of our Excel training courses and book your seat on any one of the different Excel courses we have on offer before 31 March 2020 and get ready for take-off with a 20% discount. You can also take a look at all our public courses here or download our 2020 Training Catalogue right now!

BOTi Essential Course Excel 2013

Excel Advanced Course MS Office 365

Microsoft Excel Pivot Tables Course

Writing Excel Macros with VBA

And, give yourself a pat on the back for finding a way to solve the ‘bad guy’ problem.  Click the image below for some Grammy Award winning entertainment.

With every breath you take, don’t be a Puff Daddy. Take the Sting out of Leap Year proposals – Take the Leap and Learn to Lead!

 

Leap Day on February 29 has been known as a day of traditions, superstitions and folklore since it was first introduced over 2000 years ago by Julius Caesar.

It is also believed that to balance out the traditional roles of women, an old Irish legend claims that St Brigid made a deal with St Patrick which allowed women to propose to men every four years on Leap Day.

But, despite traditions, whether you are a man or a woman, who wants to hang around waiting for a proposal?

Most women would be too embarrassed to take on this kind of leadership task.  And most men would be ticked off at being denied their role as the one to do the hunting and proposing.

So, just because it’s February and what with Valentine’s Day, Leap Day and any other day in between why wait for a proposal?

Take the leap and learn to lead with a 20% discount off any one of our leadership courses.  Follow the links below to view some of our leadership training courses or you can also take a look at all of our public courses here or download our  2020 Training Catalogue right now to find the exact course that you are looking for.  Then, simply book before 29 February.  You don’t need a ring.  Give us a ring and we will hook you up.

Taking Charge as a Leader and Closing the Gap Between Specialist and Manager

Build Winning Teams to Achieve Company Objectives

Monitoring Individual Performance to Create High Functioning Teams

Leadership and People Management Training Course

 

Or, still feeling like some Puff Daddy? Click the image below.

 

 

Why you should invest in Knowledge Management – an organisation’s very own gold mine 

Knowledge Management or ‘KM’ refers to the process of creating, sharing, using and managing an organisation’s knowledge and information.  The purpose behind the KM approach is to achieve organisational objectives by using knowledge to its greatest potentials.

Knowledge Management – an established discipline since 1991

Knowledge Management has been an established discipline since 1991.  Many large companies, non-profit organisations and public institutions deploy dedicated resources into KM initiatives and these initiatives are generally focussed on organisational objectives such as competitive advantage, improved performance, innovation, integration, the sharing of lessons learned and continuous improvement of the organisation.  Knowledge Management is frequently incorporated into a company’s IT or Human Resources function and there are dedicated consulting companies that provide Knowledge Management advice to organisations to help them embed the KM philosophy as an indispensable tool.

Knowledge Management is an organisational learning enabler

Hence, Knowledge Management efforts tend to overlap with organisational learning, however, KM is different to organisational learning in that it focusses on the management of knowledge as a strategic business asset and fostering the sharing of knowledge.  Knowledge Management is therefore an organisational learning enabler.

Knowledge Management seeks to pinpoint what is essentially competitive advantage in terms of knowledge that is inherent within the minds of individuals working within an organisation.   Within organisations the effective use of Knowledge Management also means that systems need to be created to allow the establishment of new knowledge to be harnessed and communicated to employees for the purpose of ensuring that such is embedded within the ethos of the company’s product and service offerings.  Yet, the effective use of Knowledge Management also involves a structured approach when it comes to ensuring that knowledge is accessible when needed and disseminated to individuals responsible for making decisions well in advance.

Why should organisations invest in Knowledge Management?

While the reasons for investing in Knowledge Management are numerous, here are some of the main ones:

  • Helps to retain staff for longer and reduces intellectual capital loss as a result of individuals leaving the company.
  • Higher levels of employee satisfaction as a result of empowerment and increased personal development.
  • Not ‘reinventing the wheel’ for every new initiative translates into major cost savings.
  • Disseminating knowledge quickly and easily means higher levels of productivity.
  • Encourages democracy in the workplace by providing easy access to knowledge by all individuals.
  • With knowledge learning is that much faster.
  • Faster learning means greater competitive advantage.
  • Knowledge management software means access by everyone at the click of a mouse.

Knowledge sharing versus information hoarding

To remain competitive, organisations should embrace knowledge sharing as a philosophy as opposed to what is often seen as information hoarding.  Hence, the focus shifts from the strategic management of financial and physical resources to the effective management of intellectual capital.  Many organisations now recognise that knowledge has tremendous value and as such have embarked upon extensive knowledge management programmes.

The advantages in “knowing what you know”

Many executives and business owners are not always aware of the knowledge pool that exists within their organisations and it is the task of Knowledge Management to establish systems that leverage the collective knowledge, expertise and experience within the organisation.  This is in line with shifting from a more industrial-based economy to one that is information-based.

An organization’s ability to effectively mine its own knowledge is a definite competitive advantage and as a consequence, knowledge has become the new basic economic resource over labour, natural resources and capital.  Knowledge Management can therefore be seen as the organisation’s very own gold mine.

Two types of knowledge

Two types of knowledge exist within organisations.

  • Tacit knowledge

Tacit knowledge is difficult to articulate and refers to the personal, context specific and experiential knowledge that lives in the minds of individuals and teams.

  • Explicit knowledge

Explicit knowledge is easily communicated and shared and consists of codified procedures, scientific formulas or universal principles.

How is tacit knowledge communicated?

There are a number of ways that tacit knowledge can be disseminated through the organisation.  For instance:

  • Mentorships
  • Apprenticeships
  • Communication via internal mail
  • Communication via the company Intranet

Communities of practice

The company’s internal mail system or intranet are extremely useful in disseminating knowledge throughout the organisation.  Yet, knowledge is also often transferred via informal communication channels through communities of practice.  For instance, groups of individuals that gather around the coffee machine or aqua cooler or even smokers who convene in the smoking area are in the business of exchanging knowledge.  Knowledge transferred in this manner is extremely useful since it helps individuals to get their work done more effectively.  It is for this reason that communities of practice find their place in the overall knowledge management effort.

Two types of Knowledge Management Strategies

Two different types of Knowledge Management strategies exist within most companies.

  • Codification strategy

The first type is focussed on using computer hardware whereby knowledge is codified and stored in a database for easy use and access.  This is known as the codification strategy.

  • Mentoring strategy

In certain organisations knowledge is closely affiliated with the individuals responsible for creating it and is mainly shared via direct person to person contact.  This often happens when mentors pass on information to their mentees.

Following the most appropriate strategy

It is important for companies to follow the Knowledge Management strategy that is most appropriate.  Since, following the wrong strategy or trying to focus on both types at once can have detrimental effects on the business.  Those organisations that use knowledge effectively tend to pursue one strategy over the other and use other to support the first.  These two strategies should only be used simultaneously when business units within the organisation operate like stand-alone entities.

Any organisation that intends to manage knowledge as a resource should design and implement processes and procedures that create, safeguard and utilise known knowledge and incorporate it into other dedicated initiatives.  Effective knowledge management systems harness the skills and competencies inherent within organisations and enable knowledge growth by encouraging individuals to perform at their best.

 

Will 2020 mark the beginning of a new era of Roaring Twenties?

In 100 years we have moved from the 2nd through to the 4th Industrial Revolution – Will 2020 mark the beginning of a new era of Roaring Twenties?

In 2020 we live in a world populated by more I-phones than people.  And 100 years ago, after World War 1, the economic boom of the Second Industrial Revolution saw people working in factories and on farms where the only form of social media was the ‘wireless’ radio against a backdrop of the Charleston Dance, Jazz music and women wearing Flapper dresses.  Such were the Roaring Twenties.

Today, while we still listen to Jazz, we no longer dance the Charleston.  But, there is a lot more to the job market than factories and farming and with technology leading the way there are critical skills that we all need to develop to meet the demands of the new era of the 4th Industrial Revolution.

Get the Roaring 2020’s going with these top insights:

  1. Embracing the ‘gig economy:  Today’s workforce is composed of more contractors and freelancers than ever before.  This is known as the ‘gig’ economy.
  2. Working remotely:  Thanks to mobile technology more and more people are working remotely.  Gone are the days of the traditional office.
  3. Humans working alongside machines:  Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms and intelligent machines are coming into the workforce as co-workers alongside humans.
  4. Developing a culture of lifelong learning:  As technology continues to evolve so humans will need to evolve.  This is where everyone is required to adapt their skills throughout their working lives.

Improve your earning through lifelong learning

This is where BOTi fits in.  Improve your earning through lifelong learning.   See our public courses here or download our  2020 Training Catalogue right now to get roaring!

Or just click on the image below to keep dancing the Charleston.

 

Professional Report Writing Skills Training Course

Don’t be scared of writing…Anyone can Write clearly and easily with our Report Writing Course:  Professional Report Writing Skills Training Course!

Report Writing Course

This course (Professional Report Writing Skills Training Course: A Report Writing Course ) is designed for individuals who need to present information in report format.

 

The Challenge Johannesburg (Sandton), Cape Town, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – South Africa

In today’s world a number of important decisions are made on the strength of reports. It is logical that if you wish to play a key role in an organization, your report writing skills will be regularly tested.

Learning and honing business writing skills can have a positive impact on an individual’s career advancement. Effective channels of communication make an organization run smoothly. Professional quality writing (taught via out Report Writing Course) improves productivity and the ability of all functional areas to work together, particularly in an increasingly global workplace where collaboration is the norm.

The Solution (Professional Report Writing Skills Training Course:Johannesburg (Sandton), Cape Town, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – South Africa)

The outcomes of the course (Professional Report Writing Skills Training Course) include:

  • Relate the purpose, content, form, frequency and recipients of a range of reports.
    • The regular reports are identified for a selected organisation.
    • The information needs of the organisation are linked to the purpose of each identified report.
    • A template is drawn up for each report in the company specific format including the mandatory content headings.
  • Liasing with relevant parties and verifying that reported information is in accordance with requirements and purpose of the report.
    • Identify information sources & organisational procedures for obtaining & distributing information.
    •  List each report and the information sources required for input to the report.
    • Draw up list of each information source, from whom it is obtainable, when it is available, its level of confidentiality, and to whom it should be returned.
  • Compile reports related to a selected business function. The identified reports are compiled using current information. The created templates are used to write the reports and any necessary modifications are made and noted, to ensure compliance with business requirements.  Possible amendments to reports are made in line with suggestions from recipients.

 

TRAINING APPROACH

Our two day training course is designed so that the knowledge acquired is applied practically, so that the business environment can be enhanced.

The course has a strong focus on an outcomes based approach and is presented to encourage group participation and involvement. Key mechanisms used include:

 

  • Role-plays
  • Practical relevant Exercises
  • Speeches and Presentations
  • Team sessions
  • Practical Demonstrations
  • Questionnaires
  • Discussions  and
  • Case examples

 

All delegates (for Professional Report Writing Skills Training Course or Report Writing Course: Johannesburg (Sandton), Cape Town, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – South Africa)  will receive:

  • Material, refreshments (lunch, tea),
  • Memory stick (with relevant tools and models that can be easily accessed when applied back at work) (Reception and telephone etiquette Training Course)

Professional Report Writing Skills Training Course  is an essential skill.

Business Writing Quiz

For a free quiz of your knowledge- click below:

Public Course Schedule and Costs

Please click on link below for our closely linked public course:

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Customized Courses – Book or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer the above course across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get an instant proposal or book your course NOW:

Book Course, Anytime, Anywhere

Or alternatively click on the button below to view our full Public Course Calendar of close to 100 events:

2018 Public Course Calendar

 

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 info@boti.co.za

Knowledge Management – an organisation’s very own gold mine

Knowledge Management – an organisation’s very own gold mine  

 

Knowledge Management or ‘KM’ refers to the process of creating, sharing, using and managing an organisation’s knowledge and information.  The purpose behind the KM approach is to achieve organisational objectives by using knowledge to its greatest potentials.

Knowledge Management – an established discipline since 1991

Knowledge Management has been an established discipline since 1991.  Many large companies, non-profit organisations and public institutions deploy dedicated resources into KM initiatives and these initiatives are generally focussed on organisational objectives such as competitive advantage, improved performance, innovation, integration, the sharing of lessons learned and continuous improvement of the organisation.  Knowledge Management is frequently incorporated into a company’s IT or Human Resources function and there are dedicated consulting companies that provide Knowledge Management advice to organisations to help them embed the KM philosophy as an indispensable tool.

Knowledge Management is an organisational learning enabler

Hence, Knowledge Management efforts tend to overlap with organisational learning, however, KM is different to organisational learning in that it focusses on the management of knowledge as a strategic business asset and fostering the sharing of knowledge.  Knowledge Management is therefore an organisational learning enabler.

Knowledge Management seeks to pinpoint what is essentially competitive advantage in terms of knowledge that is inherent within the minds of individuals working within an organisation.   Within organisations the effective use of Knowledge Management also means that systems need to be created to allow the establishment of new knowledge to be harnessed and communicated to employees for the purpose of ensuring that such is embedded within the ethos of the company’s product and service offerings.  Yet, the effective use of Knowledge Management also involves a structured approach when it comes to ensuring that knowledge is accessible when needed and disseminated to individuals responsible for making decisions well in advance.

Why should organisations invest in Knowledge Management?

While the reasons for investing in Knowledge Management are numerous, here are some of the main ones:

  • Helps to retain staff for longer and reduces intellectual capital loss as a result of individuals leaving the company.
  • Higher levels of employee satisfaction as a result of empowerment and increased personal development.
  • Not ‘reinventing the wheel’ for every new initiative translates into major cost savings.
  • Disseminating knowledge quickly and easily means higher levels of productivity.
  • Encourages democracy in the workplace by providing easy access to knowledge by all individuals.
  • With knowledge learning is that much faster.
  • Faster learning means greater competitive advantage.
  • Knowledge management software means access by everyone at the click of a mouse.

Knowledge sharing versus information hoarding

To remain competitive, organisations should embrace knowledge sharing as a philosophy as opposed to what is often seen as information hoarding.  Hence, the focus shifts from the strategic management of financial and physical resources to the effective management of intellectual capital.  Many organisations now recognise that knowledge has tremendous value and as such have embarked upon extensive knowledge management programmes.

The advantages in “knowing what you know”

Many executives and business owners are not always aware of the knowledge pool that exists within their organisations and it is the task of Knowledge Management to establish systems that leverage the collective knowledge, expertise and experience within the organisation.  This is in line with shifting from a more industrial-based economy to one that is information-based.

An organization’s ability to effectively mine its own knowledge is a definite competitive advantage and as a consequence, knowledge has become the new basic economic resource over labour, natural resources and capital.  Knowledge Management can therefore be seen as the organisation’s very own gold mine.

Two types of knowledge

Two types of knowledge exist within organisations.

Tacit knowledge

Tacit knowledge is difficult to articulate and refers to the personal, context specific and experiential knowledge that lives in the minds of individuals and teams.

Explicit knowledge

Explicit knowledge is easily communicated and shared and consists of codified procedures, scientific formulas or universal principles.

How is tacit knowledge communicated?

There are a number of ways that tacit knowledge can be disseminated through the organisation.  For instance:

  • Mentorships
  • Apprenticeships
  • Communication via internal mail
  • Communication via the company Intranet

Communities of practice

The company’s internal mail system or intranet are extremely useful in disseminating knowledge throughout the organisation.  Yet, knowledge is also often transferred via informal communication channels through communities of practice.  For instance, groups of individuals that gather around the coffee machine or aqua cooler or even smokers who convene in the smoking area are in the business of exchanging knowledge.  Knowledge transferred in this manner is extremely useful since it helps individuals to get their work done more effectively.  It is for this reason that communities of practice find their place in the overall knowledge management effort.

Two types of Knowledge Management Strategies

Two different types of Knowledge Management strategies exist within most companies.

  • Codification strategy

The first type is focussed on using computer hardware whereby knowledge is codified and stored in a database for easy use and access.  This is known as the codification strategy.

  • Mentoring strategy

In certain organisations knowledge is closely affiliated with the individuals responsible for creating it and is mainly shared via direct person to person contact.  This often happens when mentors pass on information to their mentees.

Following the most appropriate strategy

It is important for companies to follow the Knowledge Management strategy that is most appropriate.  Since, following the wrong strategy or trying to focus on both types at once can have detrimental effects on the business.  Those organisations that use knowledge effectively tend to pursue one strategy over the other and use other to support the first.  These two strategies should only be used simultaneously when business units within the organisation operate like stand-alone entities.

Any organisation that intends to manage knowledge as a resource should design and implement processes and procedures that create, safeguard and utilise known knowledge and incorporate it into other dedicated initiatives.  Effective knowledge management systems harness the skills and competencies inherent within organisations and enable knowledge growth by encouraging individuals to perform at their best.

 

2019 Public Course Schedule

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Empower yourself with Essential Conflict Management Skills, Johannesburg

Developing your Interpersonal Skills to Effectively Resolve Conflict , Cape Town

Master Effective Business Communication & Presentation Skills, Cape Town

Empower yourself with Essential Conflict Management Skills, Johannesburg

Developing your Interpersonal Skills to Effectively Resolve Conflict , Cape Town

Master Effective Business Communication & Presentation Skills, Cape Town

Master Effective Business Communication & Presentation Skills, Cape Town

Mastering Asset and Inventory Management , Johannesburg

Events Management Expertise , Cape Town

Essential Time Management Skills, Johannesburg

Conquering Risk Management Course, Johannesburg

Essential Time Management Skills, Cape Town

Conquering Risk Management Course, Johannesburg

Key Negotiation Skills, Johannesburg

Organizational Ethics & Conduct Training , Cape Town

1
2

Professional Presentations Course, Johannesburg

Taking charge as a Leader & Closing the Gap between Specialist and Manager , Johannesburg

Adding value in Managing a Diverse Workforce , Cape Town

Professional Presentations Course, Johannesburg

Taking charge as a Leader & Closing the Gap between Specialist and Manager , Johannesburg

Adding value in Managing a Diverse Workforce , Cape Town

Taking charge as a Leader & Closing the Gap between Specialist and Manager , Johannesburg

Monitoring Individual Performance to create High Functioning teams , Johannesburg

Business Writing Skills for function and Purpose , Johannesburg

Business Writing Skills for function and Purpose , Johannesburg

Mastering Service Level Agreements and Contracts, Johannesburg

Finance For Non Finance Managers , Cape Town

Mastering Service Level Agreements and Contracts, Johannesburg

Finance For Non Finance Managers , Cape Town

8
9
10

Professional Presentations Course, Durban

Professional Presentations Course, Durban

Creating High Performing Teams through Performance Management, Johannesburg

Professional Presentations Course, Cape Town

Creating High Performing Teams through Performance Management, Johannesburg

Professional Presentations Course, Cape Town

Business Writing Skills for function and Purpose , Durban

Creating High Performing Teams through Performance Management, Johannesburg

Taking charge as a Leader & Closing the Gap between Specialist and Manager , Durban

Monitoring Individual Performance to create High Functioning teams , Cape Town

15
16

Introduction to Computers, Johannesburg

Creative Problem Solving and critical thinking course, Johannesburg

Finance For Non Finance Managers , Johannesburg

Creative Problem Solving and critical thinking course, Johannesburg

Finance For Non Finance Managers , Johannesburg

Business Writing Skills for function and Purpose , Cape Town

Finance For Non Finance Managers , Johannesburg

Conquering Risk Management Course, Durban

Creative Problem Solving and critical thinking course, Cape Town

Customer Service Excellence , Johannesburg

Excel Combo – Beginners to Graphs and Problem Solving, Johannesburg

Powerful Project Management (as a project team member), Durban

Excel Combo – Beginners to Graphs and Problem Solving, Johannesburg

Powerful Project Management (as a project team member), Durban

Mastering Data & Records Management , Johannesburg

22
23

Events Management Expertise , Johannesburg

Business Communication Strategies: verbal/non-verbal and written , Johannesburg

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Johannesburg

Events Management Expertise , Johannesburg

Business Communication Strategies: verbal/non-verbal and written , Johannesburg

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Johannesburg

Business Communication Strategies: verbal/non-verbal and written , Johannesburg

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Johannesburg

Conquering Risk Management Course, Cape Town

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Johannesburg

Chairing a Meeting with Confidence & Keeping Good Minutes, Johannesburg

Master Effective Business Communication & Presentation Skills, Johannesburg

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Johannesburg

Master Effective Business Communication & Presentation Skills, Johannesburg

Excel Combo – Beginners to Graphs and Problem Solving, Cape Town

29
30

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Cape Town

Introduction to Computers, Durban

Mastering Data & Records Management , Durban

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Cape Town

Mastering Data & Records Management , Durban

MS Word for Beginners, Durban

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Cape Town

Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations , Johannesburg

Excel for Beginners, Durban

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Cape Town

Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations , Johannesburg

Chairing a Meeting with Confidence & Keeping Good Minutes, Durban

Microsoft All-in-One Basic Computer Course , Cape Town

Effectively Manage Human Resources & Labour Relations , Johannesburg

Excel Combo – Beginners to Graphs and Problem Solving, Durban

5
6
+ Export Events

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 info@boti.co.za

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training

Course Introduction

Don’t be caught SHORT! This comprehensive course enables managers to :

  • Recruit and select people for defined positions within an organisation or the personnel recruitment industry
  • Undertake a performance review
  • Understand labour legislation
  • Deal with disciplinary hearings

The Challenge

The Human Resources funtion is key for any organization to achieve its strategic objectives. After all labour is one of the company’s most important resources and needs to be properly managed.

The Solution

Key outcomes of this course include:

  • Formulating performance standards for team members in a unit
  • Establishing systems for monitoring performance of team members
  • Preparing for a performance review of a team member
  • Conducting performance review interview
  • Planning and preparing for recruitment and selection
  • Recruiting applicants
  • Selecting staff
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the purpose, application of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Describing the regulation of working time and leave as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Describing the particulars of employment, remuneration and termination of employment as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Demonstrating an understanding of the monitoring, enforcement and legal proceedings as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Able to to effectively handle hearings and reach reasoned decisions on the basis of evidence presented

Delivery Method

  • Two-day Instructor Led HR workshops in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban (South Africa) based training
  • Strong delegate participation and practical application of theory

Our objective of this course is to ensure that the acquired tools and knowledge are user friendly and easily applied in the workplace.

All delegates will receive:

  • Material, refreshments (lunch, tea),  after training assistance for 3 months (Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course)
  • Memory stick (with relevant tools and models that can be easily accessed when applied back at work) (Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course)

Upcoming Public Courses

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

Human Resources and Labour Legislation

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Customized Courses – Book or Obtain Instant Quote

We offer the HR Management Course / HR Course / HR Workshopacross the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get an instant proposal or book your course NOW:

Book Course, Anytime, Anywhere

Or alternatively click on the button below to view our full Public Course Calendar of close to 100 events:

2018 Public Course Calendar

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 info@boti.co.za

Getting to grips with the Labour Relations Act of South Africa – all you need to know about how it operates

 

This article is an informative yet easily digestible summary of The Labour Relations Act South Africa which is guided by Section 27 of the Constitution.

The Labour Relations Act entrenches the rights of workers and employers to form organisations for collective bargaining.  In conjunction with the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, it also safeguards social justice in the establishment of rights and duties of employers and employees, regulates the organisational rights of trade unions, and deals with strikes and lockouts, workplace forums and other ways of resolving disputes.  Through the Commission for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA), Labour Court and Labour Appeal Court it also deals with strikes and lockouts, workplace forums and other ways of resolving disputes.

Labour Relations Act, labour relations

Who does the labour Relations Act apply to?

The Labour Relations Act applies to employers, employees, trade unions and employer organisations.  However, it does not apply to members of:

  • The National Defence Force
  • The National Intelligence Agency
  • The South African Secret Service

Hence, the Labour Relations Act covers the laws that govern labour in South Africa and is guided by Section 27 of the Constitution, which entrenches the rights of workers and employers to form organisations for collective bargaining.

Employer and Employee Organisations

In terms of the Act, all employees and employers have freedom of association which invariably means that they reserve the right to form, join and participate in the activities of registered organisations and that their membership means that they cannot be discriminated against.

The difference between a registered and unregistered union

Unions that are registered with the Department of Labour (DoL) are overseen by constitutions that abide by the principle of calling for a ballot prior to holding a strike or lockout.  Within the union, they also rule against racial as well as gender discrimination.  While organisations do not have to be registered with the DoL, registered unions however, are entitled to more organisational rights than otherwise.

What organisational rights entail

Trade union representatives reserve the right to carry out the following activities provided that such do not disrupt work activities.

  • Enter an employer’s premises with the intention to recruit new members
  • Conduct meetings and ballots in the workplace
  • Deduct trade union subscriptions from the salaries of members
  • Request relevant information from employees that is not legally privileged

Should a certain number of trade union members, that is, not less than 10 exist within the workplace, representatives can be elected to exercise organisational rights.

The higher the number of members a trade union has the higher the number of representatives it can choose, hence the more rights it will have in the workplace.  Should a union have organisational rights in the workplace its representatives will be entitled to oversee certain functions as follows:

  • Assist employees with grievance and disciplinary hearings
  • Monitor employer compliance in terms of Labour Law
  • Report on contraventions of the Labour Relations Act.

Union representatives are also entitled to a reasonable period of paid leave in order to perform such tasks.

How a union acquires organisation rights

Registered trade unions need to first follow the correct procedure in order to exercise organisational rights within the workplace.  Employers should be given fair warning of the union’s intention to exercise its rights and the union should prove that there is adequate support with respect to its endeavours within the organisation.

In the case where an agreement cannot be reached in terms of granting organisational rights the matter can be referred to the CCMA.  A commissioner will be appointed in an attempt to resolve the dispute through conciliation and if the dispute cannot be resolved either party can request that the matter be settled through arbitration.

  • The right to strike

Instead of approaching the CCMA a union may choose to strike.  However, should it do so it will need to wait for a period of one year prior to requesting the CCMA to grant organisational rights.

Union Security Agreements

Two types of agreements provide additional security and boost the bargaining power a union has.

  • Agency shop agreement

The agency shop agreement is a system whereby non-union employees are required to pay a certain amount of money into a special fund as a result of them benefiting from the union’s activities in the workplace or sector.

  • Conditions
    • The agency shop agreement system can only be put in place if the majority of employees in the workplace are members of the union
    • The amount of money paid into the special fund by non-union employees cannot exceed a normal member’s subscription amount
    • The fund should be used exclusively for the purposes of advancing the socio-economic interests of employees and may not, for example, be used to pay political parties. However, it can be used for example in a campaign against a VAT increase.
  • The closed shop agreement

The closed shop agreement entails that the employer and union both agree to compulsory union membership.  Those workers who do not wish to join a union can face dismissal and expulsion from the union will also result in dismissal.

  • Conditions
    • The union must be a majority union where the relevant employer and the union in question both agree to a closed shop system.
    • A ballot must be held among employees in question and a two thirds majority must be in favour of the closed shop system in order for it to be implemented.
    • Funds used are also restricted to the advancement of the socio-economic interests of its members.

BOTI offers courses on the Labour Relations Act across South Africa.  Book now!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course

What takes place when employees do not wish to join a union

When employees refuse to belong to a union on the grounds of conscience they are referred to as conscientious objectors.   In this case, they can request that their contribution be paid into a fund managed by the Department of Labour (DoL).   Where a closed shop agreement is concerned conscientious objectors who are dismissed may challenge their dismissal in the Labour Court.  Should the Labour Court find in favour of the objector, the union and not the employer will be required to pay due compensation.

Should at least one third of the employees sign a petition to end the agreement at least three years after a closed shop agreement was made a ballot should be held to establish whether the agreement should continue.

Collective bargaining

The Labour Relations Act promotes what is termed: centralised collective bargaining which describes employers in a sector or area of work who join forces to bargain with one or more unions who may be representing their employees.  For instance, a group of mining companies may join forces in order to negotiate with mineworkers’ unions.

Three systems are involved in collective bargaining.

  • Collective agreement

The collective agreement is a simple agreement between an employer, for example, the Chamber of Mines and a union/s, for example, the National Union of Mineworkers.   The collective agreement only affects these two parties concerned.

  • Conditions
    • Both parties must agree to a collective agreement.
  • Bargaining councils

A bargaining council agreement covers a wide range of issues for example wages, benefits and grievance procedures and extends to all employers and employees within the boundaries of the council’s representation provided that certain requirements are adhered to.

  • Conditions
    • In order to establish a bargaining council there should be sufficient representation in both the union and employer organisations. The degree of representation must be approved by the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC).
  • Rights
    • It is the task of bargaining council agents to monitor and enforce all collective agreements. Hence, they have the power to issue compliance orders, publish the contents of collective agreements and conduct investigations into various complaints.

Statutory Councils

A statutory council is a weaker version of the bargaining council.  It cannot be extended to any parties external to the council without the approval of the Minister of Labour.

  • Conditions
    • There must be a 30% representation on both sides in order to establish a statutory council which means that at least 30% of the workers must be employed by 30% of the employers in the sector.
  • Rights
    • Even in a workplace that has no union members unions that are members of a statutory council are entitled to organisational rights of access, ballots, meetings and stop order facilities.

Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council

Set up by Section 35 of the Act, the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) is one of the most important bargaining councils and is responsible for negotiating common issues among public service employees.  It has the right to establish additional bargaining councils for various sectors involved in public service.

The Labour Relations Act makes provision for workplace forums

The Labour Relations Act also makes provision for workplace forums that encourage all employees, including non-trade union members to engage in promoting their own interests in the workplace.  Workplace forums comprise elected workers who engage with interested parties regularly to discuss conditions in the workplace.  Such issues handled by workplace forums are better suited to resolution through consultation as opposed to collective bargaining, for instance, education and training, job grading, criteria for increases or bonuses, product development plans and mergers or transfers of ownership.

Workplace forums also have the right to present other proposals to the employer which should be given due consideration.  The employer must provide the forum with concrete reasons should such proposals be rejected.

The aim of workplace forums is to establish a dialogue in the workplace that will boost efficiency in the workplace and employers can consult workplace forums regarding various issues.   While workplace forums do not remove the employer’s right to make unilateral decisions, they increase employee representation in the workplace.

Joint decision-making issues

Joint decision-making issues refer to certain workplace issues that are set aside by the Act which means that employers are required to consult with workplace forums regarding these particular issues as follows:

  • Disciplinary procedures and codes
  • Rules that govern social benefit schemes such as housing or provident funds
  • Workplace rules that are not related to employee conduct
  • Affirmative action measures

N.B.  Did you know?  In terms of the Labour Relations Act employees cannot strike over joint decision-making issues

As prescribed by collective agreements between employers and representative trade unions, issues can either be added to or removed from this list.

As far as such issues are concerned agreement must be reached otherwise they should be referred to the CCMA.  Should the matter fail to be resolved the employer can request that it be resolved through arbitration.

Employees may not strike over joint decision-making issues.

Establishing a workplace forum

The setting up of a workplace forum is restricted to a representative and registered trade union or group of unions and a workplace forum may only be established in a workplace consisting of more than 100 employees.  The process is overseen by the CCMA who appoints a commissioner to assist both parties in coming to an agreement in terms of the functions of the forum.  Should agreement not be reached the CCMA will establish a forum that abides by the rules of the Act.

Guidelines for the constitution of a workplace forum, in particular the process of electing a workplace forum can be found in Schedule 2 of the Act.

Special rights are assigned to trade unions who are recognised by employers as the bargaining agent for all employees.  In this case, they may apply to the CCMA to set up a trade union based workplace forum which means that the union can appoint forum representatives without holding an election.

A workplace forum can only be dissolved if there is a private agreement that allows for this.  Should there be no private agreement in place, a workplace forum can only be dissolved if a representative from the trade union requests a ballot that results in a majority vote in favour of the dissolution of the forum.

  • The rights of workplace forum representatives
    • Each member of the workplace forum must be given a realistic amount of time off to carry out duties and/or receive training with no salary deductions.
    • An employer must provide facilities in order for the forum to operate.
    • Workplace forums may invite experts to attend meetings

 

Workplace forums – how they operate

Workplace forums operate by conducting three types of meetings.

  • Holding regular meetings with representatives
  • Holding regular meetings with the employer during which session the employer must present a report on the company’s performance and financial situation. The employer must also report on the company’s financial situation and any future plans on a yearly basis.
  • Holding meetings with other employees in the workplace to report on activities and any joint decisions made by those at the meeting as well as the employer.
  • Meetings are conducted during working hours and workers concerned are entitled to full wages.

BOTI offers courses on the Labour Relations Act across South Africa.  Book now!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course Course

Industrial Action

All industrial action, including strikes, lockouts and picketing is regulated by the Labour Relations Act.   The Act allows for the constitutional rights of employees to strike and provides recourse to employers to seek recourse via lockouts.

When a worker can strike and when an employer can lockout

Disputes over matters of mutual interest between employers and employees may involve strikes and lockouts.  Such include:

  • Wage increases
  • The demand for the recognition of a union as a collective bargaining agent
  • The demand to establish or join a bargaining council
  • The demand for organisational rights
  • The demand to suspend or negotiate unilateral changes in the workplace
  • Unprotected lockouts or strikes by the other party
  • Workers may, in certain cases, strike over retrenchments

What a lockout entails

A lockout takes place when an employer decides to withdraw work from employees or closes the workplace during a labour dispute.

Strikes

Refusing to work only constitutes a strike if two or more workers participate in the action. As long as the refusal to work has a common work-related purpose, the workers concerned may work for different employers.  For example, a domestic worker cannot strike alone yet mineworkers working for different employers are able to do so.

Varying degrees of strike action exist, including:

  • go-slows involving workers decreasing productivity rates
  • work-to-rule which means that employees do no more than the bare minimum required by the rules of the workplace in question
  • intermittent strikes which takes place when employees start and stop the same strike action over a period of time
  • overtime bans which take place when workers refuse to do any voluntary or compulsory overtime work

Two types of strike action exist:

 

Protected Strikes

The first involves protected strikes which provide workers with a certain degree of security in the sense that they cannot be dismissed for striking unless they engage in activities involving misconduct during the strike and employers cannot get a court interdict to stop the strike. Employers are also not allowed to seek damages due to production losses during the strike and they must continue to provide food and accommodation should such form part of the employees’ wages, although employers can reclaim such funds by applying to the Labour Court once the strike has ended.

In terms of the Labour Relations Act workers must follow certain steps in order to commence a protected strike.

  • The issue over which workers intend to strike must first be referred to a bargaining or statutory council or the CCMA.
  • The council concerned or CCMA must attempt to resolve the issue through conciliation within a 30 d ay period.
  • Should the matter remain unresolved a certificate to this effect must be issued.
  • The employer concerned must be given 48 hours’ notice of the intended strike by workers unless the employer is the State where in this instance a 7 day notice period is required.

Union members may force a registered union to hold a ballot prior to holding a protected strike.  A special procedure for disputes also exists which concerns refusals to bargain.  In such instances workers must obtain what is termed an advisory award prior to the strike which cannot force parties to bargain.

  • Exceptions

There are certain situations whereby workers do not need to follow procedure.  Such include:

  • Should the strike be in response to an unprocedural lockout
  • Should the strike be allowed in terms of the conditions of a collective agreement
  • Where the parties to the dispute are council members and the matter has been dealt with in terms of the constitution of the council
  • Should an employer unilaterally change an employee’s working conditions

Unprotected Strikes

If proper procedure is not followed or if any of the following apply a strike will not be protected:

  • A collective agreement is in place that protects the issue being disputed from strike action
  • In terms of this Act, or any collective agreement, the matter must be referred to arbitration or to the Labour Court.
  • The issue is regulated by an arbitration award, collective agreement or sectoral determination.
  • The parties are involved in providing an essential service, for example the South African Police Service (SAPS) and any service that protects personal or public safety or maintenance service, that is where the interruption of that service will physically destroy the working area.

Lockouts

A lockout takes place when an employer prevents employees from entering the workplace in an attempt to force them to accept a demand.  As with strike action, there are protected lockouts and unprotected lockouts.

Protected Lockouts

In the case of a protected lockout workers cannot apply to the court to get an interdict against the action and the lockout does not constitute a breach of contract on the part of the employer.  As is the case with protected strikes employers are not required to pay wages while a protected lockout is underway and employees cannot sue their employers for any losses sustained.  Nevertheless, an employer cannot dismiss an employee who has been locked out and replacement labour can only be hired if the lockout is in response to a strike and for the duration of the lockout.  As with protected strikes, the same rules apply to food and clothing.

In order for a lockout to be protected, employers must follow proper procedure – which is the same as the procedure for holding a protected strike:

  • The issue over which workers intend to strike must first be referred to a bargaining or statutory council or the CCMA.
  • The council concerned or CCMA must attempt to resolve the issue through conciliation within a 30 day period.
  • Should the matter remain unresolved a certificate to this effect must be issued.
  • The employer concerned must be given 48 hours’ notice of the intended strike by workers unless the employer is the State where in this instance a 7 day notice period is required.
  • Exceptions

As with protected strikes, there are certain cases in which this procedure does not have to be followed.  Such include:

  • when the parties to the dispute are members of a council that has dealt with the dispute within its constitution
  • when the lockout has been allowed by the procedures in a collective agreement
  • when the lockout is in response to an unprocedural strike.

 

Picketing

Only a registered trade union has the right to authorise a picket and it can only be held in a public place outside of the workplace, unless the union has the employer’s permission to picket.  The picket must be peaceful and must follow the Code of Good Practice on Picketing issued by NEDLAC.


Labour Relations Act, Labour Relations

BOTI offers business training courses on the Labour Relations Act across South Africa.  Book now!

Human Resources Management and Labour Relations Training Course

Dismissal and disciplinary procedure

Dismissal involves any of the following:

  • A contract of employment has been terminated by an employer with our without notice.
  • An employee reasonably expected the employer to renew a fixed term contract of employment on the same or similar terms but the employer offered to renew the contract on less favourable terms or did not renew it at all
  • An employer refuses to allow a female employee to resume work after taking maternity leave in terms of any law, collective agreement or her contract of employment or was absent from work for up to four weeks before the expected date, and up to eight weeks after the actual date of birth of her child.
  • An employer who dismisses a number of employees for the same or similar reasons has offered to re-employ one or more of them but has refused to re-employ another
  • An employee terminates a contract of employment with our without notice because the employer made continued employment intolerable for the employee

 

When can an employee be dismissed?

An employee can only be dismissed for misconductincapacity or business-related (i.e. operational) reasons.   However, proper procedure for dismissal must always be followed.

Misconduct entails an employee having deliberately or carelessly broken a rule at the workplace, for example, stealing. In such cases, a person may only be dismissed once the employer has followed proper procedure for dismissal due to incapacity.

Incapacity means that the worker has been unable to perform his or her duties properly because of ill health or lack of skills, that is inability.  If an employee is not doing their job properly, he or she can only be dismissed once the employer has followed correct procedures.

HOW READY ARE YOU FOR THE 4TH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION?

May the 4th Industrial Revolution be with you – Part 1

This is the first in a series of articles that explore the impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution on modern society.  To understand this phenomenon requires that we think beyond the concept of digital and take a closer look at how the digital space impacts the human space.

In the past 150 years technology has grown exponentially and now that we are literally catching up with ourselves so that we can effectively operate in a world where we have become increasingly reliant on machines not only for comfort, but for survival, it is time to stand still and contemplate what that means for us when it comes to earning a living.

In 1984, did the directors of the movie Terminator have a premonition of the future?

“The Terminator” is a science fiction film that was released in 1984, directed by James Cameron and starring renowned actor turned politician Arnold Schwarzenegger.

4IR is about more than just the rise of the machines

Lessons from the future brought to life in Hollywood – is the future made on the stage?

Schwarzenegger plays the role of a cyborg assassin sent back in time from the year 2029 to 1984 to kill Sarah Connor whose son John Connor would one day lead the rebellion against machines in a post-apocalyptic future.   Yes, you read right, the cyborg assassin was sent back from the year 2029, which is only 10 years from now.  John’s father, Kyle Rees, was sent back in time to protect Sarah and safeguard the upcoming birth of his son which would ultimately result in saving humanity from extinction by machines.

Undoubtedly, scenes from a science fiction movie such as The Terminator characterise the darker side of what we have come to know as the 4th Industrial Revolution, which involves the fusion of technologies that is responsible for blurring the lines between physical, digital and biological spheres and collectively known as cyber-physical systems.  Ultimately, what comes across in this film are scenes of a world run by machines who want nothing more than to eradicate humanity and run the world themselves.

The fact of the matter is that whether we like it or not, today, we are controlled by machines.  Not to say that they are about to turn the tables and kill off the human race, but, without them it is very difficult, if not near to nigh impossible, for us to survive the demands and challenges of the modern era

What does the 4th Industrial Revolution involve?

The 4th Industrial Revolution has a broad signature across many different fields with technology breakthroughs in numerous disciplines including:

  • Fully autonomous vehicles
  • Robotics
  • The Internet of Things
  • Industrial Internet of Things (IIOT)
  • Fifth-generation wireless technologies (5G)
  • Additive manufacturing/3D printing

The 4th Industrial Revolution is different from the previous three eras in that instead of being marked by technological advances, it is concerned rather with advances in communication and connectivity.  Such technologies hold the potential to further connect billions more people to the web and significantly enhance business and organizational efficiencies as well as helping to regenerate the environment using improved asset management techniques.

Build up to the 4th Industrial Revolution

It is not difficult to see how the build up to the 4th Industrial Revolution has its roots in the 3rd Industrial Revolution or Digital Revolution which deals with how fundamental economic change happens with the rise of three types of technological advances, that is:

  • How goods or humans are moved
  • How we communicate and manage information
  • How we power our economies

The 3rd Industrial Revolution therefore was primarily concerned with transformative potentials involving:

  • The Internet of Things and 5G networks
  • Automated driving
  • Renewable energy

The digital revolution began during the 1980s and the birth of its ‘children’, the personal computer, the Internet and information and communications technology was therefore responsible for the advancement of technology in terms of moving from analogue electronic and mechanical devices to what we have today.

Recap on the first two stages of Industrial Revolution

  • The First Industrial Revolution occurred during the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe and North America with the agrarian, rural societies becoming industrial and urban. The textile and iron industries as well as the advent of the water wheel followed by the steam engine were core drivers of the Industrial Revolution.
  • The Second Industrial Revolution occurred between 1870 and 1914 prior to World War 1. It marked a growth period for pre-existing industries as well as expansion into new industries such as electricity, steel and oil and electric power was used for mass production.  This period was responsible for significant technological advances such as the internal combustion engine, the telephone, the light bulb and the phonograph.

Read and write versus tap and swipe

A world run by machines means that we need to work hand in glove with these machines.  Nowadays, the launch pad for education and training in the modern world starts off with children in their first year of schooling using a tablet instead of a pencil and paper to learn to read and write.  Today, children first learn to tap and swipe on the tablet before they learn to read and write.  We have accepted this although we may not be able to relate to how children these days even have their own digital footprint by the age of two!  This poses even further challenges for us in that before we know it, our children will have mastered the world without us being involved since everything they learn at school takes place in a digital environment.

Skill up for the 4th Industrial Revolution

So, how do we skill up for the 4th Industrial Revolution to meet our needs and the needs of the world at large in a machine-run world?  It is simple enough to grasp that what we ultimately need to bear in mind is that technology training, computer skills training and anything involving understanding how digitisation affects our daily lives will do the trick, at least for now.  The next article in this series deals with the impact of training humans in a world run by machines.  Not to be missed!

At Business Optimization Training Institute we are abreast of the times and we pride ourselves in being able to provide you with appropriate technology and computer skills training courses to meet the needs of the 4th Industrial Revolution.  Tap and swipe, read or write, we’ve got them covered.

 

Helen Fenton, Senior Analyst:  Business Optimization Training Institute boti.co.za

BOTi Courses Overview – Negotiation and Conflict Management Training

(Conflict Resolution Training Courses; Conflict Resolution Training Johannesburg, Cape Town. Pretoria (across South Africa); Conflict Resolution Course)

Reduce Conflict!

Don’t be scared of conflict- Rather know how to deal with it and reduce stress in the workplace!

Course Introduction

The Conflict Management and Negotiation Skills Training Course  aims to teach delegates the knowledge, skills, and competencies required to support and master conflict and negotiation skills.

The Challenge

Conflict is part of our current reality in the rapidly changing global environment. Employees of private and state owned entities need to be ready to deal with all differing types of conflict. These include personal conflicts and organizational conflicts. Conflict management and negotiation skills are critical skills for any leader in the workplace.

It is essential that managers become familiar with the theory, processes, and methods for conflict management and negotiations.

The Solution

Key outcomes of this course include:

  • Develop the attributes of a good conflict manager
  • Describe the main sources of conflict
  • Describe appropriate techniques to manage conflict
  • Implement a strategy to resolve conflict
  • Communicate effectively with an employer with regard to conflict issues.
  • Describe the main sources of conflict
  • Understand Organizational conflict modes are explained with examples.
  • Describe the appropriate action plan and strategies to manage conflict.
  • Explain appropriate techniques in conflict management.
  • Explain the attributes of an effective conflict manager.
  • Work effectively with individuals and teams in order to understand conflict and the resolution thereof.
  • Organise oneself and one`s activities so that conflict can be identified and dealt with.
  • Collect, analyse and identify information supplied by parties to a conflict in order to accurately convey them to affected parties.

This course can also be described as Conflict Management in the Workplace Training as it is designed specifically for Corporate situations.

Conflict Management Courses in South Africa (Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban, Pretoria)

Work Together & Reduce Conflict

Delivery Method

  • Two-day Instructor Led classroom based training
  • Strong delegate participation and practical application of theory

The objectives of Conflict Management Courses in South Africa or Negotiation and Conflict Management Training Courses or Negotiation and Conflict Management Courses, is to ensure that the acquired tools and knowledge are user friendly and easily applied in the workplace.

All delegates will receive:

  • Material
  • Refreshments (lunch, tea)
  • Memory stick (with relevant tools and models that can be easily accessed when applied back at work)
  • Attendance Certificate
  • After training assistance for 3 months

Conflict Management and Negotiation Skills Training Course is an essential skills. As JFK said:  “Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.” 

Upcoming Public Courses

Please click on link below for related public course/s:
There are no upcoming events at this time.

Book Now or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer Conflict Management Courses in South Africa or Negotiation and Conflict Management Training Courses or Negotiation and Conflict Management Courses and other customized courses  across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get get instant proposal or book you course:

Book This Course Or Obtain Quote – Now

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 info@boti.co.za

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Learnerships / Qualifications Program:  National Certificate: Generic Management

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Learnerships / Qualifications Program: 

National Certificate:  Generic Management

Introduction to the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Program

BOTI offers 5 different Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) qualifications as follows:

Qualification SAQA ID Level
National Certificate: Business Administration Services 23833 2
National Certificate: Business Administration Services 67465 LP 23655 3
Further Education and Training Certificate: Generic Management 57712 LP 74630 4
Further Education and Training Certificate: Business Administration Services 61595 4
National Certificate: Generic Management 59201 LP 60269 5

BOTI will help you to successfully navigate the rpl process.  Take advantage of your prior learning and enrol now for a recognition of prior learning program suited to your needs.

What is RPL?

“RPL means the comparison of the previous learning and experience of a learner howsoever obtained against the learning outcomes required for a specified qualification, andceptace for purposes of qualification of that which meets the requirements. RPL entails that the learner is assessed to prove his/her competence against a chosen qualification”.  MICT SETA,    http://www.mict.org.za/downloads/What_is_RPL.pdf

Get your rpl application underway and enrol now for rpl training and assessment.  BOTI offers rpl courses across South Africa.

How does it work?

Learners who pre-qualify (based on experience and past educational level) for the RPL Program will be required to demonstrate their competence and prior learning by preparing various Portfolios of Evidence (POE).  BOTI will provide a guided approach to completing the relevant POEs. Upon completion and submission, if the POE indicates that a learner is competent (after assessment and moderation) the relevant qualification will be awarded after submission/ acceptance by the Services SETA. In the case of Learnerships, it is the responsibility of the employer to complete and submit a learnership agreement to their relevant SETA for registration purposes.  BOTI will register the students on the LMIS System of the Service SETA against the selected Qualification (Learnership).

BOTI will help you to successfully navigate the rpl process.  Take advantage of your prior learning and enrol now for a recognition of prior learning program suited to your needs.

National Certificate: Generic Management

SAQA I.D. 59201 NQF Level: 05 Credits: 162

Course duration:  7 contact days over 12 months

Public Course Fee R22 250 (excl. VAT) per learner. If onsite training is held a minimum of 10 individuals is required

Extended Optional Program: We also offer an extended onsite program whereby for an additional R195 000 (excl VAT), an additional 7 Portfolio of Evidence guidance sessions are held. In this extended program students can also have up to three additional Portfolio of Evidence Reviews (if required).

 

Portfolio of Evidence (POE)

A series of 7 workshops will guide delegates through the process of completing 5 Portfolios of Evidence and upon assessment, if deemed competent and based on prior experience, the qualification will be awarded.  The portfolio of evidence will cumulatively cover following areas, amongst others:

  • Management of Performance
  • Leading & Managing a Team
  • Developing Operational Plans / Strategies
  • Relationship Management
  • Development of Staff
  • Ethics and Risk Principles

BOTI will help you to successfully navigate the rpl process.  Take advantage of your prior learning and enrol now for a recognition of prior learning program suited to your needs.

 

Who is this recognition of prior learning (RPL) program aimed at?

  • Middle managers
  • Senior managers

 

What are the pre-requisites for the RPL?

Registration is available to leaners who have a minimum of 2 years in a management position and are competent in maths, communication and computers at NQF 4 (Grade 12 or higher).

BOTI will help you to successfully navigate the rpl process.  Take advantage of your prior learning and enrol now for a recognition of prior learning program suited to your needs.

What is this qualification about?

This qualification deals with managing first line managers in an organisational entity.  First line managers may include team leaders, supervisors, junior managers, section heads and foremen.  The qualification deals with a range of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values including:

  • Initiating, developing, implementing and evaluating operational strategies, projects and action plans, and where appropriate, recommending change within teams and/or the unit so as to improve the effectiveness of the unit.
  • Monitoring and measuring performance and applying continuous or innovative improvement interventions in the unit in order to attain its desired outcomes, including customer satisfaction, and thereby contributing towards the achievement of the objectives and vision of the entity.
  • Leading a team of first line managers, by capitalising on the talents of team members and promoting synergistic interaction between individuals and teams, to enhance individual, team and unit effectiveness in order to achieve the goals of the entity.
  • Building relationships using communication processes both vertically and horizontally within the unit, with superiors and with stakeholders across the value chain to ensure the achievement of intended outcomes.
  • Applying the principles of risk, financial and knowledge management and business ethics within internal and external regulatory frameworks in order to ensure the effectiveness and sustainability of the unit.
  • Enhancing the development of teams and team members through facilitating the acquisition of skills, coaching, providing career direction, and capitalising on diversity in the unit.

BOTI will help you to successfully navigate the rpl process.  Take advantage of your prior learning and enrol now for a recognition of prior learning program suited to your needs.

Qualification outcomes that successful delegates will be required to demonstrate

  • Apply the principles of knowledge management
  • Build teams to achieve goals and objectives
  • Create and manage an environment that promotes innovation
  • Develop, implement and evaluate an operational plan
  • Devise and apply strategies to establish and maintain workplace relationships
  • Formulate recommendations for a change process
  • Lead people development and talent management
  • Manage a diverse work force to add value
  • Monitor and evaluate team members against performance standards
  • Monitor, assess and manage risk
  • Select and coach first line managers
  • Analyse leadership and related theories in a work context
  • Apply a systems approach to decision making
  • Apply mathematical analysis to economic and financial information
  • Apply the principles of ethics to improve organisational culture
  • Develop, implement and evaluate a project plan
  • Manage the finances of a unit
  • Use communication techniques effectively
  • Identify brand mix elements
  • Conduct negotiations to deal with conflict situations
  • Recruit and select candidates to fill defined positions
  • Demonstrate ways of dealing with the effects of dread diseases and in particular HIV/AIDS

 

BOTI will help you to successfully navigate the rpl process.  Take advantage of your prior learning and enrol now for a recognition of prior learning program suited to your needs.

 

Book Now or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer customized courses across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get get instant proposal or book your course

View Calendar for the latest course

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

BOTI will help you to successfully navigate the rpl process.  Take advantage of your prior learning and enrol now for a recognition of prior learning program suited to your needs.

 

You might also enjoy: 

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Learnerships / Qualifications Program: National Certificate: Business Administration Services NQF Level 03

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Learnerships / Qualifications Program: Generic Management Basics Course Qualification Title: Further Education and Training Certificate: Generic Management

 

MAY THE 4TH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION BE WITH YOU – PART 1

How ready are you for the 4th Industrial Revolution?

Only two decades into the 21st Century and the way of the world is fraught with change in light of the impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution as we move further into an era where the distinction between man and machine is becoming less and less obvious.

The way we live, the way we work and the way we think are all going through changes as the new technologies deploy into our homes and places of work.

What does the 4th Industrial Revolution involve?

The 4th Industrial Revolution has a broad signature across many different fields with technology breakthroughs in numerous disciplines including:

  • Fully autonomous vehicles
  • Robotics
  • The Internet of Things
  • Industrial Internet of Things (IIOT)
  • Fifth-generation wireless technologies (5G)
  • Additive manufacturing/3D printing

The 4th Industrial Revolution is different from the previous three eras in that instead of being marked by technological advances, it is concerned rather with advances in communication and connectivity. Such technologies hold the potential to further connect billions more people to the web and significantly enhance business and organizational efficiencies as well as helping to regenerate the environment using improved asset management techniques.

Buildup to the 4th Industrial Revolution

It is not difficult to see how the build up to the 4th Industrial Revolution has its roots in the 3rd Industrial Revolution or Digital Revolution, which deals with how fundamental economic change happens with the rise of three types of technological advances, that is:

  • How goods or humans are moved
  • How we communicate and manage information
  • How we power our economies

The 3rd Industrial Revolution therefore was primarily concerned with transformative potentials involving:

  • The Internet of Things and 5G networks
  • Automated driving
  • Renewable energy

The digital revolution began during the 1980s and the birth of its ‘children’, the personal computer, the Internet and information and communications technology was therefore responsible for the advancement of technology in terms of moving from analogue electronic and mechanical devices to what we have today.

Recap on the first two stages of Industrial Revolution

  • The First Industrial Revolution occurred during the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe and North America with the agrarian, rural societies becoming industrial and urban. The textile and iron industries as well as the advent of the water wheel followed by the steam engine were core drivers of the Industrial Revolution.
  • The Second Industrial Revolution occurred between 1870 and 1914 prior to World War 1. It marked a growth period for pre-existing industries as well as expansion into new industries such as electricity, steel and oil and electric power was used for mass production. This period was responsible for significant technological advances such as the internal combustion engine, the telephone, the light bulb and the phonograph.

Bringing home the reality of the impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution

At home with Alexa and a history lesson with HAL – Science fiction has an uncanny knack of being able to predict the future

Home automation is a biggie right now.  The Amazon Alexa, which has now become known as simply ‘Alexa’ is a home virtual assistant developed by Amazon which uses voice interaction, is capable of making to-do lists, setting alarms, providing weather, sports and traffic updates and other forms of real-time updates such as the news and is also able to control a number of smart devices with itself as the home atumoation system.  Alexa’s ‘skills’ can also be upgraded with new apps such as audio features to include additional functionality.

Alexa users say a ‘wake’ word that alerts an Alexa device of a particular command that it needs to perform.  Take a look at the Amazon Echo Dot here to find out more about these devices:

(sponsored link)

Science fiction has an uncanny knack of being able to predict the future in that the Alexa is not an entirely new concept since a brief look at history will demonstrate that it uncannily appears to be born out of 20th Century Hollywood productions.  In the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey, a system known as HAL (Heuristically Programmed Algorithmic Computer) is a sentient computer or form of AI (artificial intelligence) that interacts with the crew of the Discovery One spacecraft and controls the ship’s systems.  As well as maintaining the ship’s systems while on an interplanetary mission, amongst other things, HAL is also capable of speech and speech recognition, natural language processing, lip reading, facial recognition, automated reasoning, interpreting emotional behaviours, spacecraft piloting and playing chess.

 

Whether we like it or not the 4th Industrial Revolution technologies are here to stay and the way we bank, eat, travel and communicate are only a handful of activities that are affected.  The trick of course is to embrace the advantages of what technology has to offer and not be left behind the curve.  But, how ready are we for unbridled change?  Take our fun quizz ‘Find out how ready you are for 4IR’ and find out where you stand in the overall  scheme of things.

BOTi Essential Quiz – ‘Find out how ready you are for 4IR’

Are you still using old tech to get things done?  Or are you still stuck somewhere in the 20th Century of things instead of turning to the Internet of Things?  The 4th Industrial Revolution, along with its disruptive technologies, is rearing its head in more ways than one – and in this new era, the only constant is change.  Take our Quiz ‘Let’s see how ready you are for 4IR’ and test your ability to embrace change.

May the 4th Industrial Revolution be with you – Part 4:  “High on Emotion”..(1)

May the 4th Industrial Revolution be with you – Part 4:  “High on Emotion”..(1)

Emotional Intelligence is the new X Factor

This is the fourth in a series of articles that explore how the effects of the 4th Industrial Revolution are filtering into our lives on a global scale, what the workplace of the future will look like in the years to come and how we can ensure that we have the right skills to succeed.  This article explores the concept of Emotional Intelligence as the new X Factor in securing success in the new era of the 4th Industrial Revolution.

Disruption as drivers of the stages of Industrial Revolution

Disruption has been the force behind each stage of Industrial Revolution.  During the First Industrial Revolution, which took place in the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe and North America, it was the textile and iron industries, the introduction of the water wheel and the steam engine that served as the core drivers.  The Second Industrial Revolution that happened between 1870 and 1914 just prior to World War 1, was concerned with expansion into electricity, oil and steel and the Third Industrial Revolution, that began during the 1980s ushered in automated production with the introduction of electronics and information technology.  Now, as we move into the 4th industrial Revolution, as opposed to advances in technology, we are dealing with advances in communication and connectivity and along with that come a whole host of paradigm shifts in that it is not so much what we do but how we do it that determines how well we succeed going forward.

 

The World Economic Forum’s (WEF) Future of Jobs 2018 report highlights certain skills that will be a prerequisite for success in the workplace in 2020 and beyond.  The report is concerned with helping governments, business as well as individuals to skill up for the workplace of the future and interestingly, none of these skills are by any description technical in nature.   Rather, they are concerned with how we relate to one another and high on the list of these essential skills is Emotional Intelligence (EQ).

With the advent of the 4th Industrial Revolution the distinction between physical, digital and biological systems is becoming increasingly blurred in that soon it will be difficult to tell the difference between tasks that are human driven and those that are carried out by robots.

 Are you ready for the 4th Industrial Revolution?  Click here to take our fun quizz ‘Find out how ready you are for 4IR’

BOTi Essential Quiz – ‘Find out how ready you are for 4IR’

Are you still using old tech to get things done?  Or are you still stuck somewhere in the 20th Century of things instead of turning to the Internet of Things?  The 4th Industrial Revolution, along with its disruptive technologies, is rearing its head in more ways than one – and in this new era, the only constant is change.  Take our Quiz ‘Let’s see how ready you are for 4IR’ and test your ability to embrace change.