Employment Equity Training Providers : Employment Equity Short Course – Employment Equity Workshop

Exceed Your Equity Targets with our Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course

Being a Employment Equity Training Providers:our Employment Equity Short Course or  Employment Equity Workshop (Employment Equity Course) aims for the learner to better understand the Employment Equity Act. One will also comprehend the linkage between Skills Development, Employment Equity, B-BBEE & an entity’s strategy.

(Employment Equity Course)

Excel at Employment Equity

 

Employment Equity Training Providers : Employment Equity Short Course - Employment Equity Workshop

Outline: Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course

Being a Employment Equity Training Providers, our Employment Equity Short Course or  Employment Equity Workshop (Employment Equity Course) held in Johannesburg (Sandton), Cape Town, Durban, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria – South Africa, deals with the following:
1. The History of Learning & Development in South Africa
Overview of the National Qualifications Framework
Certification & Assessment
Credibility of Practitioners & Providers

2. Transformational Legislation
Linking Skills Development to Legislation
Compliance & Ethics
Statutory Reporting

3. Employment Equity
Statutory Responsibilities – Reporting & Compliance
Setting up an Employment Equity Committee
Monitor & Evaluate Implementation
Construct an EE Blueprint for your Organisation
Reporting on the Implementation of EE

 

 

Course duration and fees: Employment Equity Training Providers – Employment Equity Short Course or  Employment Equity Workshop

Our two day Employment Equity Course is designed so that the knowledge acquired is applied practically, so that the business environment can be enhanced.

Please consult schedule for course costs or contact BOTI for a quote.

 

Recommended Prior Experience and Knowledge: Being a Employment Equity Training Providers: Employment Equity Short Course or  Employment Equity Workshop

The course (Employment Equity Short Course or  Employment Equity Workshop is designed for the following attendees:

For the Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course it is advisable that you have the following experience/knowledge:
Grade 11 with Numeracy & Communication literacy.

BOTI is a Employment Equity Training Providers via Employment Equity Short Course or  Employment Equity Workshops (Employment Equity Course).

Public Course Schedule and Costs

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Book Now or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer customized courses across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get get instant proposal or book your Employment Equity Course

:

Book This Course Or Obtain Quote – Now

View Calendar for the latest course

 

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 info@boti.co.za

 

 

The essentials of how to create an employment equity plan:  Employers, did you know that you can even customize your Employment Equity Plan? 

 

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

Introduction to the important elements surrounding the creation and implementation of an Employment Equity Plan

This article is intended as an introduction to the important elements surrounding the creation and implementation of an Employment Equity Plan as well as elements of Affirmative Action (AA) and Employment Equity (EE) in general.  So what can you expect?  This is a complex issue, yet, observing the guidelines and taking heed of the recommendations of the Law will ensure that the process will run smoothly and efficiently.

Important factors to be borne in mind

This article also describes in detail critical factors to be borne in mind and important documents such as the Code of Good Practice and User Guide published by the Department of Labour.  BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course will ensure that you are up to speed on the intricate details.  Make sure that you are not left behind the curve.  Be informed.  Don’t delay!  Book now!

A brief overview of the Employment Equity Plan

It is incumbent upon every designated employer to design and implement an employment equity plan. The purpose of the employment equity plan is to enable the employer “to achieve reasonable progress towards employment equity”, to assist in eliminating unfair discrimination in the workplace, and to achieve equitable representation of employees from designated groups by means of affirmative action measures.

An employment equity plan must set out the steps the employer plans to follow

As a consequence, an employment equity plan must therefore clearly set out the steps that the employer plans to follow in order to achieve these objectives.

The Department of Labour has published a Code of Good Practice

And in order to assist employers, the Department of Labour has published a Code of Good Practice on the ‘Preparation, Implementation and Monitoring of Employment Equity Plans.

10 steps to preparing and implementing an employment equity plan

The Department of Labour has also published a user guide to the Employment Equity Act, detailing 10 steps to preparing and implementing an employment equity plan.   Hence, every employer should be in possession of at least these two documents that is, the Code of Good Practice and the User Guide.

An employment equity plan may be customized

No rigid format exists when creating an employment equity plan, and the Act allows employers to customize the plan to suit their own needs.

Employment equity and affirmative action (AA) apply to all designated employers and their employees

Employment equity and affirmative action apply to all designated employers and their employees, particularly those employees from designated groups.

Designated employers

Designated employers are employers who employ 50 or more employees, employers who employ less than 50 employees but whose annual turnover exceeds or equals the amounts in schedule 4 of the Employment Equity Act (EEA), or an employer who has been determined to be a designated employer in terms of a collective agreement.

Exclusions

Certain state organs are excluded, such as the National Defence Force, the National Intelligence Agency and the South African Secret Service.

 

Designated groups

Designated groups are African, Coloured and Indian people, women of all races, and people with disabilities.  All employers who have 50 or more employees on the date on which reports were due are required to report, and all employers who have 150 or more employees on the date on which reports were due are required to comply with the reporting requirements for larger employers.

 

Employers are required to take certain affirmative action measures to achieve employment equity

Chapter 3 of the Employment Equity Act requires that employers take certain affirmative action measures with a view to achieving employment equity.  Such are detailed as follows:

  • Employers must consult with the unions and employees in order to ensure that the plan is accepted by everyone concerned and to allow all parties to provide fair input.
  • Employers must analyse all employment policies, practices and procedures and prepare a profile of their workforce in order to identify any problems relating to employment Equity.
  • Employers must prepare and implement an employment equity plan, setting out the affirmative action measures they intend to take in order to achieve their employment equity targets.
  • Employers must report to the Department of Labour with regards to the implementation of the plan in order for the Department to monitor compliance in terms of the Act.
  • Employers must display a summary of the provisions of the Act in all languages relevant to their respective workforce.  These summaries are available from the Government printer and certain offices of the Department of Labour.

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!  BOTI offers business training programmes across south Africa!

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

Implementation of Employment Equity (EE)

Where it concerns the implementation of Employment Equity or EE, certain documents are apposite to the process.  Such involve:

  • The Code of Good Practice on the Implementation of Employment Equity Plans
  • The Employment Equity Act itself
  • The Regulations under the Employment Equity Act
  • The user guide published by the Department of Labour.

 

The Code of Good Practice is not law but still needs to be taken into account

It should be borne in mind that the Code of Good Practice on the Implementation of Employment Equity Plans is not law.  It has been published as a guide to employers and it does give some valuable tips and information. Despite not being law, the Code must be taken into account.

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

 

Guide to the creation of the Employment Equity Plan

All employers are required to have an employment equity plan in place which must clearly state the objectives, affirmative action measures, timetables, duration, procedures and tasks that will be implemented.

Application

The Employment Equity Act applies to all employers, workers and job applicants, but excludes members of:

·        The National Defence Force

·        The National Intelligence Agency

·        The South African Secret Service

Who do the provisions of the Act apply to?

The provisions for Affirmative Action apply to:

  • Employers with 50 or more workers, or whose  annual income is more than the amount specified in Schedule 4 of the Act
  • Municipalities
  • Organs of State;
  • Employers ordered to comply by a bargaining                  council  agreement
  • Any employers who volunteer to comply

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

To whom does The Employment Equity Act apply?

The Employment Equity Act applies to all employers and workers and protects workers and job seekers from unfair discrimination.  It also provides a framework for implementing affirmative action.

Click here for further details around what the Act entails:  Employment Equity Act

 

Preparation and implementation of the Employment Equity Plan

Employers are required to prepare and implement an employment equity plan which will enable them to achieve employment equity targets in the workplace.

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

What should be included in the Employment Equity Plan?

Based on Legislation depicted in Section 20 of the Employment Equity Act, an employment equity plan must include:

  • Yearly objectives
  • Affirmative action measures to be implemented
  • In cases where black people, women and people with disabilities are not represented:
  • Numerical targets that will enable them to achieve these objectives
  • Timetables
  • Strategies
  • Timetables for annual objectives
  • The duration of the plan (not shorter than a year or longer than 5 years)
  • Procedures that will be used to monitor and evaluate the implementation of the plan
  • Ways to solve disputes with respect to the plan
  • Those individuals responsible for implementing the plan

 

Based on legislation in Section 20, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • One or more senior managers in a company should be designated as responsible for implementing the employment equity plan.   Senior managers should also empower their managers responsible for implementation and provide them with the necessary tools and resources to achieve their objectives.  Employers should ensure that managers carry out this important task.

 

Basic Guide to Affirmative Action

  • Affirmative action ensures that qualified people from designated groups have equal opportunities in the workplace.

Application

  • The Employment Equity Act applies to all employers, workers and job applicants, but not members of the following bodies:
    • National Defence Force
    • National Intelligence Agency
    • The South African Secret Service

 

The provisions for Affirmative Action apply to:

  • Employers with 50 or more workers, or whose annual income is more than the amount specified in Schedule 4 of the Act
  • Municipalities
  • Organs of State
  • Employers ordered to comply by a bargaining council agreement
  • Any employers who volunteer to comply

 

Affirmative Action measures

  • Employers should ensure that designated groups comprising: black people, women and people with disabilities are provided with equal opportunities in the workplace.
  • Designated groups should be equally represented in all job categories and at all levels.
  • Employers should identify and discontinue processes that negatively affect designated groups
  • Employers must enable and support diversity through equal dignity and respect to all people and cultures
  • Employers should Implement changes to ensure that designated groups have equal opportunity
  • Employers should ensure equal representation of designated groups in all job categories and levels in the workplace
  • Employers should retain and develop talent among designated groups

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

Why is Affirmative Action necessary?

Based on Legislation in Section 15 of the Employment Equity Act:

  • Affirmative Action ensures that qualified designated groups consisting of black people, women and people with disabilities have equal opportunity when applying for a job.
  • Affirmative Action is also necessary to ensure that these individuals are equally represented in all job categories and at all levels of the workplace.

 

Discussing Affirmative Action with workers

Based on Legislation in Section 15 of the Employment Equity Act:

Employers are required to discuss employment equity issues with their workers. They should also include workers from all levels and aspects of the business during talks.

 

Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!  BOTI offers business training programmes across South Africa!

Who should employers talk to?

Based on Legislation in Section 16, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • When they discuss employment equity, employers should ensure that they include workers from:
  • All job categories and levels
  • Designated groups including black people, women and people with disabilities
  • Workers who are not from designated groups

 

What should employers discuss with workers?

Based on legislation in Section 16, of the Employment Equity Act:

Employers must talk to workers or their unions about the following issues with respect to employment equity:

  • Studies
  • Plans
  • Reports

Basic guide to Employment Equity studies within the working environment

  • Employers should study the relevant policies, practices, procedures and working environment. They must use these studies to make informed decisions in order to better conditions for black people, women and people with disabilities.

 

What should employers study within their own working environments?

  • Employers should gather relevant information from their working environment and conduct an intense study and analysis of their:
  • Policies
  • Practices
  • Procedures
  • The working environment in general

 Employers should study the relevant policies, practices, procedures and working environment. They must use these studies to make informed decisions in order to better conditions for black people, women and people with disabilities. What should employers study within their own working environments? Employers should gather relevant information from their working environment and conduct an intense study and analysis of their: Policies Practices Procedures The working environment in general   Want to learn more about how to create and implement an employment equity plan and how to work with a (broad based black economic empowerment) bbbee scorecard?  Enrol now on BOTI’s Employment Equity Fundamentals Training Course!

What should be included in the study and analysis?

  • The study and analysis should include a profile of the workers in every job category and at each job level within the company.
  • In order to obtain the required information employers should request employees to complete form EEA1 which provides all the relevant information fields for purposes of analysis.

ow should the information gathered from the studies be used?

Based on Legislation in Section 19 of the Employment Equity Act:

  • Employers should identify problems that have a negative effect on black people, women and people with disabilities in order to design corrective measures for implementation.
  • Employers should use data gathered to determine how black people, women and people with disabilities are represented in different job categories and at all job levels.

Basic Guide to Employment Equity Pay Gaps

  • Employers are required to submit statements that show what pay workers in different job categories and levels are receiving.  Should pay gaps between workers deemed to be unfair, measures should be taken to ensure that such are reduced or narrowed down.

 

Reducing Pay Gaps

Based on Legislation in Section 27, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • Pay gaps may be reduced through:
    • Collective bargaining
    • Obeying sectoral determinations
    • Following the rules of the Employment Conditions Commission
    • Actions in the Skills Development Act.

Submission of employment equity reports

  • Employers are required to submit employment equity reports to the Department of Labour.  Employers who are otherwise unable to do so should advise the Department in writing.
  • Public employers are required to publish summaries of their employment equity reports when compiling their annual financial reports.

 

When are employers required to submit an employment equity report?

  • Employers with less than 150 workers should submit an employment equity report within 12 months after becoming an employer; and thereafter every year ending with an even number.
  • Employers with more than 150 workers should submit an employment equity report within 6 months after becoming an employer and thereafter every year on the first working day in October.

 

Employment equity report content

Based on Legislation in Section 21, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • An employment equity report should contain all the necessary information and be signed by the Chief Executive Officer of the company.

Employers who are otherwise unable to submit an employment equity report

Based on Legislation in Section 21, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • Employers who are otherwise unable to submit an employment equity report should advise the Department in writing and provide reasons for not being able to do so.

 

Publishing the employment equity report

Based on Legislation in Section 21, of the Employment Equity Act:

  • All public companies are required to publish a summary of their employment equity report to form part of the annual financial reporting structure.

 

 

Based on Legislation in Section 22, of the Employment Equity Act

  • The Ministers of government organisations are required to table their employment equity reports in Parliament.

 

 

Please click on link below for related public course/s:

There are no upcoming events at this time.

Book Now or Obtain Instant Quote

We also offer customized courses across the country: Anytime, Anywhere. Click on the link to get get instant proposal or book your Employment Equity Course

:

Book This Course Or Obtain Quote – Now

View Calendar for the latest course

 

Please Phone Us Now To Speak to One of Our Friendly Consultants

Tel:011-882-8853

OR

FOR CELL PHONES CLICK TO CALL

Please Fill in the Form – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

Please Email Us Now  – We Will Get Back to You Within 15 minutes

 info@boti.co.za

 

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