Get up to speed on the Media Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority “MICT SETA”

Get up to speed on the Media Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority “MICT SETA”

Media Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority “MICT SETA” in a nutshell

Affectionately known as “MICT SETA” The Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority was established in terms of the Skills Development Act, 1998 (Act No. 97 of 1998).   As a SETA, The MICT sector comprises five sub-sectors that although they are interconnected they remain distinct in themselves as well as identifiable in their own right.   The following sub-sectors make up the MICT sector:

  • Advertising
  • Film and Electronic Media
  • Electronics
  • Information Technology
  • Telecommunications

Get up to speed on the Media Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority “MICT SETA”

Prevailing statistics and trends

  • The MICT sector currently involves over 21,000 companies spread across the five sub-sectors (which have been allocated to the MICT SETA through the SARS registration process).

 

  • Almost 50% of the sector employer base is constituted by organisations involved in Information Technology, which is followed by Telecommunications at 15% and Electronics at 13%; while the Film and Electronic Media and Advertising sub-sectors represent 12% each.

 

  • Of South Africa’s provinces, Gauteng claims the largest share of employers at 43%, which is followed by the Western Cape and Kwazulu-Natal with 11% and 8% respectively. According to the analysis of WSPs submitted in 2016, there were 297,831 people employed, which showed an upward trend from 274,095 based on 2015 WSP submissions.

 

  • In 2016, the Information Technology sub-sector had the highest percentage of employees with 49%, whereas the Advertising sub-sector had the lowest; with approximately 4% of employees.

The Information Technology sub-sector is further divided into Information Communication Technologies (ICT) producing activities and ICT using activities and lies at the convergence between content, commerce, community and the tools that support them.

The Information Technology sub-sector covers an array of segments, including news, market research, business process automation, media, data services, software, hardware, telecoms, financial and risk information security and many others.

The Information Technology sub-sector is anchored by the role of unified communications which enable access, storage, transmission and manipulation of information.

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

The Information Technology sub-sector continues to grow into one of South Africa’s leading providers of employment opportunities

The Information Technology sector continues to grow from a nascent industry into one of the country’s leading providers of employment opportunities and is a major contributor to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

A number of stakeholders contribute to the MICT Sector policy and regulatory environment

A number of stakeholders contribute to the MICT Sector policy and regulatory environment including industry and employer bodies, professional bodies and regulatory bodies.

In this sector, professional associations advance professional learning and knowledge in the whilst organised labour’s focus is centred around the labour rights of workers.

The MICT SETA partners with industry, Universities and TVET colleges, public as well as private, in the delivery of respective learning programmes in an attempt to address identified scarce skills.  Its commitment to expand and improve the provision of skills development for SMMEs and rural communities will immeasurably contribute towards addressing the requisite skills.

One of the main priorities of the MICT SETA is to ensure credibility of the data used for skills planning and partnering with stakeholders in scoping their skills development, leading towards effective implementation of demand-driven learning programmes that serve as practical bridges into the workplace.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Vision and Mission

Vision
To be recognised as the leader in the development of a highly skilled knowledge-based information society.
Mission
The MICT SETA generates, facilitates and accelerates the processes of quality skills development at all levels in the MICT sector.

 

Values

‘As an organisation and individuals within the organisation we value honesty and integrity;

We are eager to take on challenges and see them through;

We have a passion for developing people; and

We hold ourselves accountable to our customers and partners by honouring commitment and striving to ensure quality service delivery in line with Batho-Pele principles.’

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Learnerships

What is a learnership?

Essentially, a learnership is a work-based education and training programme that is linked to a qualification which is registered on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) with the South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA).

Learnerships are occupationally directed programmes that consist of both structured theoretical learning and practical workplace experience.

Benefits of learnerships

For the learner learnerships provide:

·         Easy access to learning

·         Increased access to employment opportunities

·         Assistance with career-pathing and self-development

·         A monthly stipend to learners while they learn

·         Opportunities that lead to the acquisition of a formal qualification

·         Fast tracking of the development of current employees

·         An entrance into the industry for unemployed learners.

For the employer, learnerships provide:

·         Skilled and experienced workers

·         Development of competent staff

·         Empowerment credentials and BB-BEE points for the company

·         Knowledgeable and competent employees who require less supervision

·         Improved workplace productivity and quality outcomes

·         A vehicle to address employment equity targets

·         Assistance in helping to fill identified skills gaps

For the Industry, learnerships:

·         Assist with helping to compete in the global marketplace

·         Build a pool of skilled, qualified and more professional workers

·         Develop their people to achieve a world-class standard of operation

 

The participants in a learnership


There are three main participants in a learnership:

·         The learner/s

·         The training provider/s

·         The employer/s

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Learnership application process

Even though the SETA facilitates the recruitment and implementation of learnerships, the responsibility to recruit learners lies with the employer, the service provider as well as the training provider.  MICT SETA encourages stakeholders who are implementing learning programmes to search the MICT SETA placement database for candidates.   For more details visit the MICT SETA website at www.mict.org.za.

 

Sector Skills Planning

Sector Skills Planning ensures:

  • Development of credible labour market information systems
  • Input into the Organising Framework of Occupations
  • Ad-hoc research in support of skills planning
  • An accurate list of scarce and critical skills
  • Approval and registration of Skills Development Facilitators
  • Review of the on-line grant system
  • Annual update of the SDF Manual and SDF training workshops and roadshows
  • Development of the WSP/ATR submission template
  • Timeous submission of WSPs/ATRs
  • Evaluation and approval of submitted WSPs/ATRs
  • WSPs/ATRs monitoring and evaluation
  • Payment of Mandatory Grants

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Inter-SETA transfers

Workplace Skills Plan (WSP)

A Workplace Skills Plan (WSP) is a document that articulates how the employer plans to address staff training and development needs in the workplace.

In order to remain competitive, organisations need to search for the best possible training solutions as an investment in staff career-pathing when implementing annual skills development plans.

Remaining abreast of industry trends and maintaining relevance is therefore pivotal when bridging gaps between present realities within organisations, their skills development needs and the career aspirations of employees.

Skills development is vital in South Africa, especially in the long term.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Annual Training Report (ATR)

An Annual Training Report (ATR) is a record of training and development undertaken over the past year and how it relates to the actual training and development plans.   Every organisation that submitted a WSP is required to submit an ATR towards the end of each year that records the training and development that was implemented.

Records of all education, training and development activities should be available to confirm the information in the report.

 

Inter-SETA Transfer

An Inter-SETA Transfer (IST) is processed due to:

  • The organisation having registered with the incorrect SETA
  • The organisation’s core business having changed since the previous registration and now better suits the industrial code of another SETA
  • The organisation falling within the jurisdiction of more than one SETA. The entire process may take up to six months

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Scarce Skills

Occupations or positions within the organisation in which there is a scarcity of qualified and experienced people, currently or anticipated in the future, either:

  • Because such skilled people are not available or
  • They are available but do not meet employment criteria.

 

Absolute scarcity

Absolute scarcity is the term used to describe a situation whereby suitably skilled people are not available, for example:

  • A new or emerging occupation, i.e. there are few, if any, people in the country with the requisite skills, qualifications and experience and education and training providers have yet to develop learning programmes to meet the skills requirements.

 

  • Firms, sectors and even the country itself are unable to implement planned growth strategies and are experiencing productivity, service delivery and quality problems directly attributable to a lack of skilled people.

 

  • Replacement demand scarcity where there are no people enrolled or engaged in the process of acquiring the skills that need to be replaced.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Relative Scarcity

Relative scarcity occurs when suitably skilled people are available but do not meet other employment criteria, for example:

  • Geographical location, i.e. people unwilling to work outside of urban areas.
  • Equity considerations, i.e. there are few if any candidates with the requisite skills, qualifications and experience from specific groups available to meet the skills requirements of firms and enterprises.
  • Replacement demand would reflect a relative scarcity if there are people in education and training (formal as well as workplace based) who are in the process of acquiring the necessary skills,

qualifications and experience but where the lead time will mean that they are not available in the short term to meet replacement demand.

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Critical Skills

Critical Skills are Specific key or generic skills within an occupation. In the South African context there are two groups of critical skills:

  • Key or generic skills which would include cognitive skills, problem solving, language and literacy skills, mathematical skills, ICT skills and working in teams.
  • Particular occupation specific skills required for performance within that occupation to fill a “skills gap” that might have arisen as a result of changing technology or new forms of work within an

organisation. Identifying Scarce Skills against Current Occupations Scarce and critical skills are identified by gathering and analysing information in respect of:

  • Hard-to-fill vacancies or long-term vacancies:

In 2014, when compared to 41 other countries surveyed, South Africa came in 4th from the bottom, with only 8% of employers reporting difficulty filling jobs. However, in 2015, the country has come in at 30th place, with 31% of employers reporting difficulty filling jobs – close on the global average of 38%. Reasons for this include the following:

  • No appropriately qualified people available, e.g. new occupation, new qualification required.
  • No appropriately experienced people available, e.g. qualification is available but experience and application in the work place is a key employer requirement.
  • No appropriately qualified and/or experienced people are available from target groups e.g. female telecom network engineers.
  • Sourcing skills from abroad: Where there is hard or anecdotal evidence that key employers in the sector are recruiting skilled workers outside of the country to fill specific occupations.
  • Higher wages: Where there is hard or anecdotal evidence that the lack of skilled people has resulted in skilled workers demanding higher wages or employers paying a premium for skill.
  • Lower productivity levels: Where enterprises or sub-sectors are reporting that scarce or critical skills shortages are being reflected in lower quality, productivity or service delivery measures. For example, there is greater wastage, more machine down-time, more mistakes, greater need for supervision, more work having to be redone to correct mistakes.
  • Lower productivity growth: Where within enterprises, sub-sectors, sectors and even nationally there is less expenditure on innovation, R&D, less product or service value added
  • The OFO has been introduced to simplify and standardise the categorisation of occupations. The OFO is a skill-based coded classification system, which encompasses all occupations in the South African context.
  • The OFO serves as a key tool for identifying, reporting and monitoring skills demand and supply in the South African labour market.
  • The OFO sets the base for linking various occupations to specific skills and assists in identifying further training needs.
  • The OFO is a skill-based classification system, which encompasses all occupations in the South African context.
  • The classification of occupations is based on a combination of skill levels and skill specialisation which makes it easy to locate a specific occupation within the framework

 Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

The learnership process

Each party to the learnership process has rights and responsibilities.  Such agreement is then lodged with the MICT SETA, assuring the provision of a quality learnership programme. Should any one party not fulfil their requisite responsibilities, an appeal can be made to the MICT SETA. The MICT SETA formally registers all learnership agreements to maintain a register of learner credits. A mentor/coach is assigned to monitor the learner’s progress in the workplace, whilst a registered assessor evaluates the progress of theoretical components.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Unemployed learners receive a monthly allowance, as laid down by the Basic Conditions of Employment of the Department of Higher Education and Training.  Please also refer to the Sectoral Determination No.5, Skills Development Act and associated regulations. Visit the Department of Higher Education and Training website (www.dhet.org.za). Employed learners are governed by the Terms and Conditions of their existing employment contract.

Learnerships can be performed at several levels on the NQF, with level 1 being Adult Basic Education and level 8 being the equivalent to a Masters or Doctorate degree.  Learners participating in a learnership programme receive credits for every unit standard successfully completed.  There is no minimum entry requirement for learnerships – all learnerships are appropriate for people of all levels of education.

 

Who is eligible to apply for a learnership?

Only employers can apply for learnerships to be implemented.  Individuals can become involved through an employer.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Graduate Internship

An internship is a programme designed to give all FET College and university graduates an opportunity to extend their academic qualifications through workplace exposure and specialised training. Participants are placed on a full-time basis, for a period of eight to twelve months, in stakeholder companies and government organisations. The purpose of this is to provide the learner with workplace experience that enhances their qualification.

 

Work integrated learning internship

Work integrated training is offered to students from the universities of technology who are required to complete their P2 activities in a workplace, following an institution prescribed logbook. Participants are employed on a contract basis for workplace integrated learning in order to ensure that they are able to complete their diplomas.

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

Reasons why learners should participate in an internship

The primary benefit for the graduate learner includes obtaining real-world workplace experience and:

  • To fast track high-level skills development;
  • To offer unemployed graduates with needed work experience; and
  • To empower graduates with practical experience, appropriate to their qualification.

 

Get even more up to speed on the impact of the MICT SETA  (mictseta mict seta) sector and boost your IT skills with BOTI’s information technology courses, end user computing training and basic computer course training programmes.  Don’t delay – book now! 

 

Benefits of participating in an internship

Graduates receive valuable workplace experience.

 

Who exactly participates in an internship?

Either employed or unemployed people can get involved in an internship, however, the MICT SETA focuses mainly on unemployed graduates. The internship usually involves the learner as a potential employee to a company; and the potential employer. Taking note of the learner’s level of education, capabilities and experience, the employer defines the workplace programme that must be completed in order for the learner to obtain the required skills for the work to be performed within the company. This workplace programme is reviewed with the learner and both parties must agree to the final programme.  In certain circumstances, the learner may need to undergo additional specialised training.  In this instance, the training provider could become a third party to the internship agreement. On completion of the learnership, the intern will receive a certificate of recognition.

What to bear in mind when applying for an internship

It again must be reiterated that it is the employer who applies for an internship and not the employee.

www.mict.org.za www.mictseta.net.za

 

BOTI Accreditations

SETA Accreditation

MICT SETA SCOPE

SETA Accreditation: In terms of the ETQA Regulations No: R 1127 of 1998 of the SAQA Act 58 of 1995, the MICT SETA  (Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority) is granted the responsibility to accredit and quality assure constituent education and training providers that deliver education and training that falls within the primary focus of the MICT SETA.

MICT DECISION TAKEN

On 29 July 2016, a final decision was taken to award the status of PROVISIONAL ACCREDITATION to Business Optimisation Training Institute for Information Technology training.

SETA ACCREDITATION SCOPE*

At this time, only the following qualification is subject to  SETA Accreditation:

  • ID: 49077
  • Qualification(s) Title: National Certificate: Information Technology: End User Computing
  • NQF Level: Level 3
  • Credits: 130

MOMENTOUS ACHIEVEMENT

The MICT Seta has congratulated Business Optimization Training Institute on the “momentous achievement”

SETA LOGO FOR BOTI

SETA Accreditation

FURTHER EXTENSIONS

Please click on  MICT SETA Letter for more details.

 

Service Seta Accreditation

BOTI is also accredited with the Services Seta for 10 Qualifications.

 

 

 

 

 

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